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Title: Briggs,Benjamin Dec 4 1872
Description: Maritime career


monkalup - February 25, 2009 04:28 AM (GMT)
Benjamin Briggs
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Captain Benjamin Briggs in an undated photoBenjamin Spooner Briggs (24 April 1835 - 1872?) was an experienced seaman and sailer of the United States. He is most famous today for having been the Captain of the merchant ship Mary Celeste when she was discovered, apparently abandoned, drifting in the calm waters of the Atlantic Ocean Maritime career
The Briggs family of Massachusetts had a long maritime history and Benjamin Briggs himself had spent most of his life at sea, and knew the perils therein well and by all accounts was an experienced, hardy and able seaman. Briggs was also a man who was well respected and admired by those who served under him due to his fairness and ability. He worked his way up the ranks to eventually becoming captain of his own ship, and also captain of numerous ships afterwards. Briggs had previously captained the brigantine Sea Foam, and in 1862 became captain of the three-masted schooner Forest King. In 1865, when he took command of the bark Arthur, Benjamin gave command of the Forest King to his brother, Oliver Briggs. Oliver was a frequent buisness partner and sailer with his brother.


[edit] Family
Benjamin Briggs was a man of outstanding moral character, devoutly religious, and was also a believer in abstinence. This caught the attention of his peers in his local community. In 1862, Benjamin Briggs married Sarah Elizabeth Cobb, the daughter of the Reverend Leander Cobb. Benjamin and Sarah took their honeymoon in Europe and sailed there in Benjamin's three-masted schooner Forest King. At some point in 1865 they had a son, Arthur S. Briggs, who was born in the family home at Rose Cottage, Marion, Massachusetts, a town known for its many local sea captains and sailors whose homes were in town, and shipbuilding. The next year, the family travelled to Marseilles, France, and returned in time for their daughter, Sophia Matilda Briggs, to be born on 31 October 1870 at Rose Cottage.


[edit] Mary Celeste
In 1871 Benjamin and his brother were considering giving up the sea and buying a hardware store in New Bedford, but apparently decided against this. In 1872 Benjamin bought a share in the brigantine Mary Celeste owned by James Winchester, formally the Amazon, and made modifications to the cabin to house his family. In late 1872, two-year-old Sarah and his wife Sophia accompanied him on a voyage from Staten Island, New York, to Genoa, Italy, while 7-year-old Arthur was left with his grandmother at Rose Cottage, Marion, Massachusetts, to attend school.

A month later the ship was found famously and inexplicably abandoned in the calm waters of the Atlantic Ocean near the Straits of Gibraltar. Briggs, Sophia and Sarah, along with the rest of the crew of the Marie Celeste, were never discovered and their fate remains a mystery.


[edit] Legacy
Through his young son Arthur who was left a home with his grandmother at the time of the voyage, Benjamin Briggs has a number of living descendants. [1]

Benjamin Briggs has been mentioned numerous times in conspiracy theories and fiction regarding the disappearance of the Mary Celeste. One classic example of this is the 1935 Hammer Film Productions The Mystery of the Marie Celeste, starring Bela Lugosi. A fictionalized version of Cpt. Benjamin Briggs was also seen in the Doctor Who episode Flight Through Eternity in 1965.

In 1884, only twelve years after the real incident, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, the creator of Sherlock Holmes, wrote a fictionalized account of the Mary Celeste entitled J. Habakuk Jephson's Statement. One reviewer sought to attribute the story to Robert Louis Stevenson, while critics compared it to Edgar Allan Poe. Doyle changed the spelling of the ship from Mary to Marie Celeste. Doyle's fictional story drew heavily on the original incident. Much of this story's fictional content, and the incorrect name, have come to dominate popular accounts of the incident. These include especially numerous things found onboard the vessel which were not. Doyle also put forward the theory that the crew were all murdered by African-American cutthroats bound on a racist jihad against all white men; however there is no evidence whatsoever to suggest this was the case. In fact, the facts of the incident would suggest anything otherwise is more likely.

A cenotaph memorializing the family is found in Evergreen Cemetery, Marion, Massachusetts. The inscription reads, "Capt. Benj S. Briggs born Apr 24, 1835, Sarah E Cobb his wife born Apr 20 1841, Sophia M, their daughter, then 10 mos, born Oct 31, 1870. Lost in Brig Mary Celeste Nov 1872" [2]


[edit] See also
Mary Celeste

, on 4 December 1872. The lifeboat was missing yet the Mary Celeste herself was not anchored and still under full sail, in perfect condition, and there were still signs of very recent habitation on the ship and sudden and unexplained abandonment. Benjamin Briggs, his wife Sarah and two-year-old daughter Sophia Matilda, along with the crew of the Mary Celeste, and the lifeboat, were never found and presumed lost. It is generally considered the greatest maritime mystery of all time.

Maritime career
The Briggs family of Massachusetts had a long maritime history and Benjamin Briggs himself had spent most of his life at sea, and knew the perils therein well and by all accounts was an experienced, hardy and able seaman. Briggs was also a man who was well respected and admired by those who served under him due to his fairness and ability. He worked his way up the ranks to eventually becoming captain of his own ship, and also captain of numerous ships afterwards. Briggs had previously captained the brigantine Sea Foam, and in 1862 became captain of the three-masted schooner Forest King. In 1865, when he took command of the bark Arthur, Benjamin gave command of the Forest King to his brother, Oliver Briggs. Oliver was a frequent buisness partner and sailer with his brother.


[edit] Family
Benjamin Briggs was a man of outstanding moral character, devoutly religious, and was also a believer in abstinence. This caught the attention of his peers in his local community. In 1862, Benjamin Briggs married Sarah Elizabeth Cobb, the daughter of the Reverend Leander Cobb. Benjamin and Sarah took their honeymoon in Europe and sailed there in Benjamin's three-masted schooner Forest King. At some point in 1865 they had a son, Arthur S. Briggs, who was born in the family home at Rose Cottage, Marion, Massachusetts, a town known for its many local sea captains and sailors whose homes were in town, and shipbuilding. The next year, the family travelled to Marseilles, France, and returned in time for their daughter, Sophia Matilda Briggs, to be born on 31 October 1870 at Rose Cottage.


[edit] Mary Celeste
In 1871 Benjamin and his brother were considering giving up the sea and buying a hardware store in New Bedford, but apparently decided against this. In 1872 Benjamin bought a share in the brigantine Mary Celeste owned by James Winchester, formally the Amazon, and made modifications to the cabin to house his family. In late 1872, two-year-old Sarah and his wife Sophia accompanied him on a voyage from Staten Island, New York, to Genoa, Italy, while 7-year-old Arthur was left with his grandmother at Rose Cottage, Marion, Massachusetts, to attend school.

A month later the ship was found famously and inexplicably abandoned in the calm waters of the Atlantic Ocean near the Straits of Gibraltar. Briggs, Sophia and Sarah, along with the rest of the crew of the Marie Celeste, were never discovered and their fate remains a mystery.


[edit] Legacy
Through his young son Arthur who was left a home with his grandmother at the time of the voyage, Benjamin Briggs has a number of living descendants. [1]

Benjamin Briggs has been mentioned numerous times in conspiracy theories and fiction regarding the disappearance of the Mary Celeste. One classic example of this is the 1935 Hammer Film Productions The Mystery of the Marie Celeste, starring Bela Lugosi. A fictionalized version of Cpt. Benjamin Briggs was also seen in the Doctor Who episode Flight Through Eternity in 1965.

In 1884, only twelve years after the real incident, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, the creator of Sherlock Holmes, wrote a fictionalized account of the Mary Celeste entitled J. Habakuk Jephson's Statement. One reviewer sought to attribute the story to Robert Louis Stevenson, while critics compared it to Edgar Allan Poe. Doyle changed the spelling of the ship from Mary to Marie Celeste. Doyle's fictional story drew heavily on the original incident. Much of this story's fictional content, and the incorrect name, have come to dominate popular accounts of the incident. These include especially numerous things found onboard the vessel which were not. Doyle also put forward the theory that the crew were all murdered by African-American cutthroats bound on a racist jihad against all white men; however there is no evidence whatsoever to suggest this was the case. In fact, the facts of the incident would suggest anything otherwise is more likely.

A cenotaph memorializing the family is found in Evergreen Cemetery, Marion, Massachusetts. The inscription reads, "Capt. Benj S. Briggs born Apr 24, 1835, Sarah E Cobb his wife born Apr 20 1841, Sophia M, their daughter, then 10 mos, born Oct 31, 1870. Lost in Brig Mary Celeste Nov 1872" [2]


[edit] See also
Mary Celeste


monkalup - February 25, 2009 04:29 AM (GMT)
Capt Benjamin Spooner Briggs
Birth: Apr. 24, 1835
Death: Nov., 1872, At Sea

Captain of the mysterious "ghost ship" Mary Celeste. Briggs, his wife Sarah Cobb Briggs, their 2-year-old daughter Sophia, and seven crewmates, sailed from Massachusetts on November 7, 1872, bound for Europe with a cargo of commercial alcohol. Less than a month later, on December 4, the ship was found sailing erratically off the coast of Gibralter. Crew from the DeGratia boarded the brigand to investigate. They found the last entry in the ship's log, dated November 24, which indicated that the voyage was uneventful. The sails were furled and the ship was in excellent condition. In the infant's crib remained the impression of a sleeping child. However, no sign of the crew or the Briggs family was ever found. A cenotaph memorializing the family is found in Evergreen Cemetery, Marion, Massachusetts. The inscription reads, "Capt. Benj S. Briggs born Apr 24, 1835, Sarah E Cobb his wife born Apr 20 1841, Sophia M, their daughter, then 10 mos, born Oct 31, 1870. Lost in Brig Mary Celeste Nov 1872" (bio by: Shiver)


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Burial::
Body lost at sea

Maintained by: Find A Grave
Record added: Oct 31 2004
Find A Grave Memorial# 9731187

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?p...gr&GRid=9731187


monkalup - April 5, 2009 02:14 AM (GMT)
Benjamin Briggs was the center of one of the most significant maritime mysteries of all time - the disappearance of the members of the Mary Celeste in 1871. Briggs was the captain of the ship when it was found inexplicably abandoned in the Atlantic Ocean. Briggs, his wife, two year old daughter, and the remainder of the crew were never found. Briggs has been referred to frequently in fiction and in conspiracy theories surrounding the old mystery.

http://listverse.com/bizarre/another-10-bi...#comment-158399




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