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Title: Anderson, Moira February 23,1957
Description: Coatbridge, Scotland, United Kingdom


Gaelle - April 4, 2006 09:49 PM (GMT)
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http://www.eveningtimes.co.uk/hi/news/5050676.html

He killed Moira - but I'm glad I made peace with my dad

IT was a meeting no-one would have thought possible. After a gap of almost 13 years, Sandra Brown was finally sitting side-by-side with the man she had long accused of murdering a little girl ... her own father.

Sandra, the Evening Times' Scotswoman of the Year in 2005, always believed her dad, Alex Gartshore, was responsible for the death of Moira Anderson, of Coatbridge, who went missing in a snowstorm in 1957.

Gartshore, 85, died at the weekend, one week after he set eyes on his daughter for the first time since 1993.

It is understood he died from advanced abdominal cancer, with two of his sons by his side.

His death came one day after what would have been Moira Anderson's 61st birthday.

Arrangements for Gartshore's funeral, which will take place in Leeds, where he lived with his third wife, have still to be finalised.

But Sandra has already decided she will not attend.

She had to wrestle with her own conscience and deal with rifts in her family when she found evidence to implicate Gartshore, a bus driver in Coatbridge in the 1950s and a convicted paedophile, in Moira's disappearance.

She denounced him in her extraordinary 1998 book Where There Is Evil, which was followed by a Channel 4 documentary.

She used the proceeds of the book to set up a foundation named after Moira to provide counselling and legal advice to children and families affected by child sexual abuse.

Gartshore had always denied involvement, but in 1999 his friend, James Gallogley, another convicted paedophile, made a deathbed confession that blamed Gartshore for Moira's death.

"I heard of my father's death on Saturday," said Sandra.

"It has been a very difficult week altogether, because I actually managed to go and see him, the week before he died.

"I saw him in hospital on Friday, March 24. He was very sick but he was still very lucid.

"He agreed to see me, and I had an hour with him.

"I think maybe quite a lot of people would be surprised at that, but I'm glad I did that."

She said the meeting was "very upsetting", but added: "We made peace with each other."

She's glad she made a last gesture, but nothing has swayed her from the belief he was involved in Moira's murder.

"The conversation we had I would prefer to remain private, but it may be a different story once the funeral has passed.

"For the sake of his family down there, my only comment at the moment would be we have seen each other and I do believe we reached a truce.

"It was an enlightening hour and I'm glad we got it and had a conversation on our own.

"It was very helpful to have the discussion we had - I think it took us both forward.

"I was warned by the nurses that I would see quite a drastic change in him, but to me he was still a very large man, even though he was 85."

Asked whether her father had made any comment about his alleged involvement in Moira's disappearance, Sandra said: "That isn't something I think it would be appropriate to comment on right now.

"I phoned a couple of cousins on Sunday night to let them know and give them the opportunity to go the funeral, if they wanted to.

"But we are clear my brothers and myself will not be attending.

"Obviously, we hope the funeral arrangements will go smoothly, but we don't intend to be a part of them.

"He died on Saturday and I would imagine the funeral will be held in the middle of this week, but I don't know."

She acknowledged the family had had good times in the years before she made her accusation public.

"Absolutely," she said. "That's what's so difficult.

"There was an opportunity (at our meeting) to reflect back on his choices in his life, but I'm glad I took the opportunity to meet him.

"Let's face it - despite everything, he was still my dad. You've only got the one dad."

She said she understood he had died peacefully, "so he has had a relatively easy passage out of this world".

Moira Anderson disappeared from her Coatbridge home on February 23, 1957, after going on an errand for her grandmother, during one of the worst snow storms that the area had ever known.

That same night, eight-year-old Sandra Gartshore awaited her father's return. Gartshore had failed to come home after work.

Even though the bus company he worked for had stopped all services in the afternoon, he was nowhere to be seen.

He arrived home just after midnight claiming he had "just been at work".

Moira's father Andrew and mother Masie spent the rest of their lives searching for their daughter. Her sisters Janet and Marjorie never recovered.

Sandra was 36 and married when the first clues to Moira's disappearance began to emerge.

She met an old family friend who remembered the Gartshore family from Coatbridge.

The friend made a passing remark to the effect her dad had once served time in Saughton prison - for sexually assaulting a 13-year-old girl.

Her father had left the family home when she was 16 and she hadn't heard from him since.

In 1992, she met him at a family funeral. She later said: "I was absolutely boiling when I saw him and decided to confront him.

"I told him I needed to talk to him and asked a few questions about the 13-year-old. But to my horror he began talking about Moira Anderson.

"He said his own father believed he had killed her and admitted he was the last person to see her alive."

Sandra pleaded with Strathclyde Police to re-examine Moira's file. As she suspected, her father had never been questioned, even though he was on bail at the time of her disappearance, and was living just a couple of streets from her home.

There had been no reconstruction or door-to-door inquiries.

Concerned by what they discovered, police gently urged Sandra to find out if any of her family had been abused by her father.

To her horror four of her cousins said they had been abused.

Police questioned Gartshore extensively but, even though her cousins agreed to give evidence against him, the Lord Advocate refused to bring the case to court.

Sandra continued her quest for justice and contacted Moira Anderson's older sister and compiled the damning evidence against her father.

Police have always been convinced Moira was abducted while travelling home on a bus, then murdered. But her body has never been found.

In 1998 Sandra exposed her father in Where There Is Evil.

The following year, she said: "He may be my flesh and blood but I loathe what I know about him and I just won't give up until he's gone."

Gartshore threatened to sue her when the book first came out.

In February 2000, the Evening Times reported how Sandra used the book's proceeds to set up a charity, the Moira Anderson Foundation, to help abuse victims, especially in cases that go to court.

Last June, an emotional Sandra received the Evening Times' Scotswoman of the Year trophy. The ceremony heard how she had organised national conferences, addressed Parliament, lobbied for changes and challenged the system.

Last July, in a last-ditch attempt to recover the schoolgirl's remains and give her a Christian burial, Anderson's sister Janet Hart contacted Les Brown, a retired Strathclyde Police detective chief inspector.

Brown now runs an agency investigating unsolved crimes and Janet asked him to re-investigate the case.

Sandra premiered a one-woman play, One Of Our Ain, to sell-out audiences in Airdrie at the end 2005, and in February this year she took it to Oran Mor, in Glasgow's West End.

In it, she told the story of her own childhood, growing up in a small community that was profoundly affected by the murder of Moira Anderson.

Her father's death may have sealed one of Scotland's longest-running murder cases.

04/04/06

Guardian - April 5, 2006 12:19 AM (GMT)
I hope this man confessed to her killing and told his daughter where she would be found. If he confessed but never told his daughter where Moira could be found then Gartshore went to his grave with the last bit of grief he could cause Moira's family.


Searcher - May 4, 2006 06:42 PM (GMT)
My thoughts exactly James. I hope his daughter has something to tell the authorities and Moira's family.

monkalup - November 16, 2006 05:22 PM (GMT)
http://news.scotsman.com/scotland.cfm?id=1160922003

Has confession solved a murder?
TANYA THOMPSON HOME AFFAIRS CORRESPONDENT

Little Moira Anderson had run dozens of errands for her grandmother. This time it was her uncle Jim who sent her off to the Co-op on a cold February afternoon, to buy a box of Black Magic chocolates for her mother’s birthday.

Dressed in her trademark pixie hat, long woollen socks and gaberdine coat, the 11-year-old made the familiar trip to the shop in nearby Laird Street, just a short distance from her grandmother’s home in Muiryhall Street in Coatbridge, Lanarkshire.

Clutching a few shillings, she braced herself against the icy winds as she hurried down the road. She was never seen again.

Moira was last spotted boarding the Cliftonhill bus at about 5pm on 23 February, 1957. What began as a routine journey has become one of Scotland’s most enduring mysteries.

Although still described by police as a missing person’s inquiry, friends and relatives from Moira’s home town are certain she was abducted and murdered.

Now, more than 40 years on, detectives are reviewing the case in the light of dramatic new evidence.

Five years ago, Alex Gartshore, the driver of the Cliftonhill bus, was named as the killer by his daughter, Sandra Brown, but the authorities insisted that there was insufficient evidence for a prosecution.

Gartshore, a convicted sex offender, has continued to protest his innocence in relation to Moira’s disappearance. But earlier this month, a national newspaper received a 15-page dossier said to be the deathbed confessions of a convicted paedophile, which appear to contain an eyewitness account of the murder. They identify where Moira’s body was dumped and implicate Gartshore in the killing.

It is claimed the girl was knocked out with chloroform and sexually abused, before being hidden in the seat-box of Gartshore’s bus. Her remains are said to be in the Tarry Burn, which runs from a former ironworks into Witchwood Pond.

The signed confession was from a disgraced church elder, James Gallogley, one of Gartshore’s closest friends, who was jailed for ten years in August 1997 at the High Court in Glasgow for abusing five girls in Coatbridge.

It is understood that Gallogley confided in fellow prisoner Alec Keil in the sex offenders’ unit at Peterhead Prison, before he died in April 1999.

Now, The Scotsman has obtained a letter, sent by Janet Hart, Moira’s sister, to Gallogley. It pleads with him to shed light on the girl’s disappearance and may have been a factor in pricking his conscience, forcing him to reveal what really happened.

In an emotional appeal to Gallogley, Mrs Hart wrote: "You will not know who I am, but I am sure you will be familiar with the name Moira Anderson.

"I am Moira’s sister, Janet, and I have been grieving for my poor wee sister for the past 40 years.

"The day that my dear sister disappeared in Coatbridge was a day that changed mine and my family’s life forever. Each year the anniversary of the day she went missing is a sorrowful one for me and all my family. My mother never stopped hoping to see her daughter again.

"My dear departed parents were never to enjoy a moment’s peace again, and went to their grave without ever knowing what happened to her."

Desperate for any clues about her sister’s fate, Mrs Hart begged Gallogley to make amends for the mistakes he had made.

She continued: "Most of us have done things in this life that we regret. Sometimes by chance, without prior warning, we can be given the opportunity to somehow make amends and to help in some ways to atone for some of the great wrongs that have been done in this world. I would like you to answer me truthfully, and perhaps make your heart a little lighter before God does come to judge you.

"I strongly suspect that Alex Gartshore murdered my sister, Moira. It would mean the whole world to me if you could ease my heartache and tell me anything you know or may have heard about her disappearance. I yearn to know what did happen to dear Moira so I can put her memory to rest before I die."

Mrs Hart, who now lives in Australia, welcomed the latest developments in the case. "When I heard there had been a confession, I broke down in tears," she said. "Now I hope and pray to God they solve this murder mystery, and maybe we can bring this all to an end."

Friends and relatives connected with the case have been convinced for years that there was a cover-up. And last week, it emerged that the hand-written dossier contains the names of senior Crown Office figures, Scottish Office employees and high-ranking policemen who Gallogley claimed were involved in the abuse of children.

Detectives have confirmed they will investigate the new allegations in an attempt to conclude an inquiry that has dogged them for almost half a century.

Gartshore, now 82 and living in Leeds, was jailed two months after Moira’s disappearance for sex offences against a 13-year-old babysitter. Sandra Brown began her own investigation following a family funeral in 1992.

She claims her disgraced father, whom she had not seen for more than 20 years, let slip that he had somehow been involved in the case, and that his own father had believed he had killed Moira.

Sandra’s grandfather had ripped up the kitchen floorboards in an effort to find the body and had pleaded with Gartshore to confess. She accused Gartshore of the killing in a powerful TV documentary and book about the case.

Now Sandra Brown has no doubt in her mind that the mystery has finally been solved. "When I heard of these latest developments, I felt like somebody had kicked me in the stomach," said the former lecturer, who set up a children’s charity in Moira’s name.

"It never went through my head that it would be an offender who would help us solve the mystery. I have always been convinced that my dad had been responsible for the disappearance of Moira. My grandfather accused my dad when he was out on bail. My grandfather lifted the floorboards to try to find the body because he was so convinced he had done it.

"For your own father and your daughter to accuse you is significant. They should be calling this a murder inquiry."

Frustrated by the lack of progress in the case, Ms Brown has accused the police and the Crown Office of years of incompetence and inertia.

"No-one wants to think that a member of their own family is involved. It is agony. But you know your own flesh and blood. It’s a 40-odd-year mystery and we are finally getting somewhere with this eyewitness account and a deathbed confession.

"I believe the mystery is now solved."


monkalup - November 16, 2006 05:25 PM (GMT)
Was my paedophile dad a murderer too?
JULIA HORTON

‘I REMEMBER you as a child.’ Those words trigger memories in all of us of our youth and an innocence long gone.

For Sandra Brown, they might have reminded her of life growing up in 1950s Scotland, the eldest child of three and the only girl.

Her parents had their share of problems, with her bus driver dad known as a bit of a ladies’ man, which ultimately led to her parents’ divorce. But the family seemed otherwise unremarkable - except that for several years Sandra was told her father was in a hospital "that children couldn’t visit".

But a comment from a long-forgotten acquaintance heralded the discovery of the sickening truth - her father was a convicted paedophile.

To suddenly learn that the man who brought you up had been jailed at Saughton prison for raping your 13-year-old babysitter would be an awful revelation at any time.

To find out such a grim secret from your childhood at a party years later through a chance conversation is unimaginable. But to then come face to face with your father for the first time since discovering the truth and hear him suggest that he is also responsible for one of Scotland’s most notorious child murders just does not bear thinking about.

Sandra not only thought about it, however, she launched an extraordinary crusade which spawned a best-selling book accusing her father of the unsolved case of Coatbridge schoolgirl Moira Anderson, who went missing in 1957.

The book, Where there is Evil, published in 1998, later led to a hard-hitting Channel 4 documentary watched by millions.

Meanwhile, Sandra’s quest for justice led her to found a national charity in Moira’s name supporting child abuse victims and their families across Scotland.

Today, sitting in her home in Edinburgh, Sandra is preparing to tell her incredible story in her own words in a new play about ordinary women achieving the extraordinary.

It will, she says, focus on "pivotal" moments in her past, including the two conversations which changed her life forever.

Now 56, she recalls the shocking day in 1985 when she found out her father’s sinister secret. She says: "I was 36, living in Pitlochry with my husband and two children. It happened at an after-show party for an amateur dramatic production of Aladdin which I was in.

"This woman said she remembered me as a little girl in Coatbridge. Then she said: ‘I always felt really sorry for what happened to your father’. Something made me ask what she meant.

"And she said: ‘When he got sent to prison, but you’ll know about that’. I said no, and she said: ‘It was about the rape of your babysitter’.

"I don’t think she realised the impact of what she had just said."

Sandra realised the awful truth about her father’s 18-month absence from the family home "in a hospital children can’t visit".

As an eight-year-old she had not questioned her mother’s explanation of events.

Confronting her mother as an adult, her worst fears were confirmed. Her father, Alexander Gartshore, had been locked up after being found guilty of the rape.

"My mum had the same view as the woman at the after-show party. She said the wee girl was a Lolita," Sandra says now, adding: "The girl was only 13."

UNLIKE her mother, Sandra, who now runs a training consultancy dealing with child safety issues, became firmly convinced of her father’s guilt as other bewildering memories from her past became disturbingly clear to her.

"I remembered as a child my friends used to say they couldn’t play with me because my dad did funny things. When you’re six or seven you think that is to do with comedy. Nobody could say to your face you’re not to play with my daughter because your father is not safe to be around.

"He never touched me inappropriately, but I remember feeling very uncomfortable around him."

It was not until 1992 that Sandra met her father again at a family funeral.

"I went to speak to him, really to tell him what a waste of space I thought he was as a parent. He was very sorry for himself, saying his own father had treated him like the black sheep of the family.

"He ended up saying that he had been treated like the black sheep over Moira Anderson, that his father had thought that he had something to do with it [her disappearance]. I was traumatised."

She was then left with an awful decision. Should she ignore this new horror to save her family from further h**l, or ask police to investigate her belief that her own father - who was the driver on the bus Moira was last seen boarding - was guilty of abduction and murder?

"I had to make some very difficult choices. One of them was to ensure that Moira was not going to be forgotten.

"It was a decision which has affected more than a decade of my life, but I have no regrets. Until I went to the police I did not know he had been involved with [the abuse of] four of my cousins too."

Her decision created rifts in her family, with some relatives cutting off her and her family - husband, Ronnie and children Ross and Lauren, both in their 20s.

Although the police took Sandra seriously enough to reopen the case, charges were never brought against her father, now in his 80s and living in Leeds. A deathbed confession by Gartshore’s friend and fellow convicted paedophile, James Gallogley, which came to light in 2003, failed to bring about fresh investigations.

The 15-page letter stated that Gartshore had sedated Moira before abusing her and leaving her in his bus, where she died "from the cold" and was then disposed of.

It is also said to have named several other people in the area including members of the police and legal profession whom Gallogley claimed were part of a paedophile ring. Sandra believes that it is the existence of a ring which explains why the case has not gone further forward.

She adds: "I remain utterly convinced that my father is responsible for that little girl’s abduction and murder, which is still very hard to say, although I don’t believe he did all of that on his own.

"I will never give up in the search for justice for that child."

Returning to discuss the forthcoming play, womensbusiness, on June 26 in London at the Soho Theatre, when Sandra will appear along with nursery nurse Lisa Potts, who was injured protecting children in a machete attack, she says: "It’s scary."

Not that that will stop her taking part, but it is only recently that she has accepted that what she has done is extraordinary. "

I did not think I was brave at the time but I have realised that I’m braver than I thought. There has to be something good that has come out of such a negative horror story."

With her charity, the Moira Anderson Foundation, now in its fifth year, there are dozens of child abuse victims who can testify that she has achieved that aim.

And with work already under way on a new book, plus talk of a second Channel 4 documentary, she means it when she says "this is not the end of the story".

For more information about the Moira Anderson Foundation, visit www.moiraanderson.com or call 01236 602890

Mystery of little girl last seen on bus driven by a pervert

SCHOOLGIRL Moira Anderson vanished on 23 February, 1957, after getting caught in a blizzard on her way to run an errand to the shops.

The 11-year-old was last seen getting on to a bus in Coatbridge, Lanarkshire, driven by paedophile Alexander Gartshore, who has repeatedly denied any involvement in her disappearance.

In 1992, police quizzed Gartshore over the case after his daughter Sandra Brown told officers she believed her father was guilty of abducting and murdering the girl.

Sandra said that Gartshore had "slipped up" and told her that his father had accused him of being involved in Moira’s disappearance.

At the time Moira vanished, Gartshore was on bail after being arrested over the rape of a 13-year-old babysitter.

Charges were never brought against Gartshore over the Moira Anderson case.

In 2003, fresh evidence was revealed in the shape of an apparent deathbed confession by James Gallogley.

He claimed that Gartshore sedated Moira with chloroform on his bus and abused her, leaving her in his bus where she died from the extreme cold.

He also alleged Gartshore, with an accomplice, then dumped Moira’s body.

Web link

ChildLine
http://www.childline.org.uk/
http://news.scotsman.com/topics.cfm?tid=684&id=420732005

monkalup - November 16, 2006 05:27 PM (GMT)
http://www.sundayherald.com/50959

Retired police chief to probe 1957 murder of 12-year-old after plea from victim’s sister




By Liam McDougall, Home Affairs Editor



A FORMER police detective is to re-investigate one of Scotland’s most notorious unsolved murder cases after being contacted by the victim’s sister and asked to end 48 years of anguish.
A police investigation into the mysterious disappearance of 12-year-old Moira Anderson from Coatbridge, Lanarkshire, in 1957 has been all but closed though her body has never been found.

But police have always been convinced that she was abducted while travelling home on a bus, then murdered.

Now, in a last-ditch attempt to recover the schoolgirl’s remains and give her a Christian burial, Anderson’s sister Janet Hart has contacted Les Brown, a retired Strathclyde Police detective chief inspector who now runs an agency investigating unsolved crimes.

Hart, 61, who now lives in Australia, told the Sunday Herald she would never give up fighting to find her sister but believed that Brown’s investigation may be her final chance for answers, as the police were unwilling to devote resources to the so-called “cold case”.

Last year it emerged that detectives had closed a re investigation of the disappearance, despite accusations by the daughter of 84-year-old Alexander Gartshore, a former bus driver, that he was responsible for the death, and a separate prison confession from a sex offender who claimed that he, Gartshore and a third man had carried out the murder.

Police have also said that a feasibility study conducted at Coatbridge’s Tarry Burn – where it is claimed the girl’s body was dumped – found it would be almost impossible to find anything because there was so much silt at the site.

Hart said: “I have contacted Les Brown because this case has been ignored for too long.

“The Scottish system seems to be saying that this is a case that should be swept under the carpet. They don’t seem to want to spend the money but she’s my sister. If it was a police officer’s child or the child of someone that really matters it would be a different story.

“Finding her would bring closure, and at last the family would be able to give Moira or her remains a decent Christian burial. My parents died never knowing what happened to their child.”

Hart said she was convinced that Gartshore, who now stays in Leeds, knew where the 12-year-old’s body could be found. She also revealed the family had kept a space for Anderson in her parents’ burial plot so they could be together again if she was ever recovered.

She added: “Probably, this is my last chance to find her.

“It’s just been unbelievable anguish. There is only one person who knows where she is and he is in Leeds.”

Moira vanished while on an errand for her grandmother during a blizzard on February 23, 1957. Wearing a pixie hat and thick coat, she was last seen getting on a bus driven by Gartshore, a convicted paedophile, who has always denied any involvement in her disappearance.

But seven years ago he was accused of being involved by his own daughter, Sandra Brown, in her best-selling book Where There Is Evil. He was jailed two months after Anderson’s disappearance for raping a 13-year-old baby sitter.

In 1999, a confession by convicted paedophile James Gallogley, written while he was dying of stomach cancer, identified where Anderson’s body was dumped and implicated Gartshore in the killing.

Both Gartshore and Gallogley worked for the same bus company in the town.

In his 15-page confession, Gallogley, a former church elder, claimed the girl was taken back to Baxters’ bus depot in Coatbridge, where she was abused by Gartshore and another, unnamed man.

He wrote: “People are going to ask why I now want to come clean and I believe this is the time to clear my chest and also clear the air.

“It is not meant to be a dossier for forgiveness but to try to make amends for what other people and I did to these children.”

The chilling confession also claimed they sedated the girl before abusing her and then put her in the seatbox of a bus. It added: “Somebody looked at her later and she was dead, but we believe it was the cold that killed her as it was very bitter that night.”

Les Brown, co-founder of voluntary organisation A Search For Justice, said he was prepared to do “whatever it takes” to bring an end to the mystery that has now spanned almost half a century.

He revealed he had already contacted police in Leeds for their assistance in making contact with Gartshore and had applied for the police files on the Anderson case through new freedom of information laws.

Brown said he too was convinced that Gartshore was the key to ending the mystery. “It would be an impossible task without the assistance of Gartshore,” he said.

“But I’m quite hopeful we’ll get a result here. She is in there somewhere [the Tarry Burn area], I am not in any doubt about that. Whatever it takes to finish this, I’ll do it.”

Asked what his motivation was for re-investigating the case, Brown said: “Take a look at her photograph – that’s my motivation.”

Gartshore could not be reached last night but, in a previous newspaper interview, he said: “I was only driving the bus and I had nothing to do with her disappearance.”

Sandra Brown, who founded the Moira Anderson Foundation to help children and families affected by child abuse, said: “There is no doubt in my mind that my father was involved in Moira Anderson’s abduction and murder. He should follow his conscience in the same way as his pal James Gallogley and end this.”

24 July 2005


monkalup - November 16, 2006 05:29 PM (GMT)
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/scotland/glasgo...est/5374022.stm

Moira documents could be released

Moira Anderson was never seen again after going on an errand
Documents relating to the disappearance of a schoolgirl nearly 50 years ago could soon be released under Freedom of Information rules.
The Scottish Information Commissioner has received a request to release the file relating to the unsolved case of 11-year-old Moira Anderson.

The youngster went missing in Coatbridge, Lanarkshire, in 1957.

Sandra Brown, who believes her father murdered Moira, has called for disclosure of the information.

Moira's body has never been found but many believe she was abducted and murdered.

A spokeswoman for the Scottish Information Commissioner Kevin Dunion said a decision on whether the documents should be released would be made shortly.

She could not confirm reports that the papers included a detailed description of the girl's death.

Deathbed confession

Moira was never seen again after going out on a shopping errand from her home during severe winter weather.

The Times newspaper reported that the documents being considered by the commissioner, described how the schoolgirl was sedated and sexually abused before being dumped.

It also reported that the documents named members of an alleged paedophile ring, including senior police officers and members of the Crown Office and former Scottish Office.

The documents are believed to be a confession by James Gallogley, a former friend of Alex Gartshore - the paedophile who was named by his daughter Mrs Brown as Moira's killer.

Strathclyde Police submitted a report to the procurator fiscal in 2004 after Gallogley made the deathbed confession from his prison cell.

He claimed Gartshore had killed the youngster before dumping her body in a spot called Tarry Burn.


Sandra Brown said her father had left victims in his wake

Mr Dunion will have to decide whether to uphold a ruling by Strathclyde Police last year not to release the confession on the grounds that doing so might prejudice any future prosecution.

A spokeswoman for the Scottish Information Commissioner said: "We cannot confirm precisely when this decision will be issued but I can confirm the decision is in the closing stages."

Mrs Brown, who grew up a few streets away from Moira, claimed in her book Where There Is Evil that her father was responsible for the murder.

She told the BBC: "My father is someone who's left a raft of victims in his wake.

"I believe he was part of something a lot bigger.

"There was protection for him and, knowing what we know about places like Belgium, we know that protection often comes from high up."

Mrs Brown has also set up the Moira Anderson Foundation, which works to help families cope with incidents of sexual abuse.

She received an OBE in the Queen's birthday honours this year, for services to child protection in Scotland.



monkalup - November 16, 2006 05:30 PM (GMT)

monkalup - December 1, 2006 01:58 AM (GMT)
http://news.scotsman.com/uk.cfm?id=1619292006

Vanished without trace: the children we must never be allowed to forget
TANYA THOMPSON
SOCIAL AFFAIRS CORRESPONDENT (tthompson@scotsman.com)
DONNA Davidson stares at the faded, black-and-white photograph of her three-year-old brother, Sandy. For 30 years she has been tormented by the image of the little boy, desperately trying to make sense of the events leading up to his disappearance.

She casts her mind back to the sunny afternoon on 23 April, 1976. Like most children on the Bourtreehill estate in Irvine, Donna and Sandy were keen to play outside. As their grandmother sat indoors, the toddler chased his afghan hound, Kissie, into the street. It was the last time anyone ever saw him.

Ms Davidson was only two years old when she followed her big brother out of the family garden in Ayrshire, but she lives with the guilt of being the last person to see him alive.

"I constantly rack my brains to see if there's something I can remember," says the 32-year-old mother of three, "but my memory turns blank."

When the dog returned alone, their grandmother raised the alarm. Police mounted a massive search, but found nothing.

"We were very close and as a wee child I took it really badly," says Ms Davidson.

"For a long time I believed he was coming back. But you realise you will never see him again."

Determined to help other families, Ms Davidson launched a nationwide campaign this week to track down the thousands of children who disappear in Britain each year.

Posters of missing youngsters will be displayed on 450 vans across the country as part of the initiative. The pictures also feature on the police-run website, MissingKids.co.uk

It is estimated that a child disappears every five minutes in the UK, equating to more than 100,000 a year. Some run away, others are forced out of their homes, while others are victims of abductions.

Although most are found, thousands are never located.

Speed is critical in locating missing children, according to campaign groups, and the rapid distribution of a child's photograph can make the difference between a fast recovery or a prolonged search.

Today, Ms Davidson still believes police reluctance to accept Sandy had been abducted led to delays in finding him.

"Time is of the essence, and you have to get the public involved quickly," she says.

"It's too late for Sandy, but if these posters can trigger the public to act, then it could help save a child's life."

Vicky Hamilton
VICKY Hamilton went missing on 10 February, 1991, during a snowstorm, following a visit to her sister Sharon's home in Livingston, West Lothian. The 15-year-old was last seen waiting for a bus in Bathgate to take her back to the family home near Falkirk.

Despite a massive police investigation and nationwide appeal, her body was never found, and detectives believe she was abducted and murdered.

Eleven days after her disappearance, Vicky's purse was found in St Andrew Square, Edinburgh, which was the main bus terminus.

Last year, her family were given fresh hope after police told them that her recovered purse could be tested for DNA.

Relatives hope forensic analysis could provide clues to who she was with on the day she vanished.

Sandy Davidson
ON 23 April, 1976, three-year-old Sandy Davidson and his sister were being looked after by their grandmother on the newly built Bourtreehill estate in Irvine, Ayrshire.

The toddler ran out into the street after the family's pet dog and was never seen again.

Sandy's sister, Donna, was only two when she followed her big brother out of the family garden. When Sandy's dog returned alone, his grandmother raised the alarm.

The family believe police reluctance to accept the little boy had been abducted hampered the inquiry.

Questioned at length by police and close relatives, Donna Davidson's memories of the day's events are vague, but she believes her brother was abducted.

The case has baffled police for three decades, and his family have no idea whether he is alive or dead.

Andrew MacRae and mum Renee
RENEE MacRae and her son, Andrew, were last seen on the afternoon of 12 November, 1976, driving south out of Inverness.

Later that evening, the car was found burnt out in a lay-by on the A9.

Almost every officer in the Highlands took part in a search which continued off and on for a full year, but the pair have never been found.

Mrs MacRae, 36, said she was going to see her sister, who then lived in Kilmarnock.

However, she had arranged to see her lover, Bill McDowell, Andrew's father, although the rendezvous never took place.

Mr McDowell has always denied any involvement in the disappearance of the pair. Police recently said they believed they were closer to solving the mystery.

Damien Nettles
DAMIEN Nettles vanished at about midnight on a stormy night in November 1996, from Gurnard, in the Cowes area of the Isle of Wight. He was last seen in a chip shop but was identified later, alone, on CCTV in the town.

Despite a major police investigation his whereabouts remain unknown. Aged 16 at the time of his disappearance, he was tall and slim for his age. Damien had a great sense of humour and was an accomplished musician, playing guitar and trombone with hopes of starting a band. Known to his friends as "Damo", he also enjoyed bodybuilding, computer games and fishing. In 1996, he was well over 6ft tall and still growing. He had short hair but favoured a longer style, had a small scar under his chin and may now have a "goatee" beard. Police said he had a good relationship with his family and friends.

Sasha McLeish
SASHA McLeish left her home at 8am on her way to school on 23 June this year. The 15-year-old, from Luton, told her family not to worry if she was late home because she was going to a dance club after school. The alarm was raised when she failed to turn up for class and did not attend the youth club later that day.

Bedfordshire Police said it was possible that the young girl had travelled to Harlesden, in north-west London, where it is thought she had a teenage boyfriend. Detective Constable Zara Carr, who is investigating her disappearance, said she was hoping a member of the public would come forward with information.

"Sasha's family are understandably worried sick, and we would appeal to anyone who has seen or heard from Sasha to get in touch."

Moira Anderson
MOIRA Anderson was last seen boarding the Cliftonhill bus in her home town, Coatbridge, at about 5pm on 23 February, 1957.

What began as a routine journey became one of Scotland's most enduring mysteries.

She had run dozens of errands for her grandmother, and this time it was her uncle Jim who had sent her off to the Co-op to buy a box of Black Magic chocolates for her mother's birthday. Dressed in her trademark pixie hat, long woollen socks and gabardine coat, the 11-year-old made the familiar trip to the shop in nearby Laird Street, just a short distance from her grandmother's home in Muiryhall Street. Clutching a few shillings, she hurried down the road. She was never seen again. Although still described by police as a missing person's inquiry, friends and relatives are certain she was abducted and murdered.

Mohammed Jahid Ul-Haque
FIFTEEN-year-old Mohammed Jahid Ul-Haque went missing from his home in Edinburgh on Sunday, 6 August this year.

Lothian and Borders Police believe the teenager may be sleeping rough on the streets of Essex, and there have been unconfirmed sightings of him in the Saffron Walden area, 50 miles from London.

Mohammed is of Asian appearance, about 5ft 2in in height, medium build with short dark hair.

A police spokesman said: "He is a young lad and we do not know if he has found accommodation. We are worried he may be living rough. We would appeal to anyone who may have seen him to contact police."

Detectives believe he may have tried to find a job in the catering trade.

Kenneth Jones
KENNETH Jones was 17 when he vanished from Glenrothes, Fife, in November 1998. He had been learning to play the cornet, just like his father, and the pair had gone to brass band practice together. Allan Jones's last evening with his son had been perfectly ordinary. But, within hours of returning home, Kenneth sneaked out, taking a sports bag and some clothes. He has not been seen since.

When his father got up for work at 8am the next morning, he thought his son was still in bed. Later, his parents presumed he had gone out with friends.

But when their only child failed to return at teatime, they began to worry, and within 24 hours of his disappearance, police were called in.

They carried out a two-day search of woodland near the family's home, but found no trace of Kenneth.

Derek Burns
DEREK Burns disappeared in March 1989. His mother, Diane, and her husband, also Derek, have not seen their son since he was a long-haired 19-year-old growing up in West Calder, West Lothian.

Three years ago, the teenager's case was featured in a special report on Scotland's missing children, and the National Missing Persons Helpline produced an artist's impression of how Derek may look as an adult. For his mother, the drawing is unnerving. The features are familiar, but the face is not instantly recognisable. It looks like someone she knew a long time ago, and yet the face in the sketch is that of her son, shown as he probably looks today, a man in his early 30s.

Derek's parents hope that a member of the public will recognise their son and come forward with clues to his whereabouts.

monkalup - February 14, 2007 08:41 PM (GMT)
http://news.scotsman.com/glasgow.cfm?id=1132762003

New claims in missing girl case
DAN MCDOUGALL AND STEVE SMITH

NEW evidence could see police reopen one of Scotland’s most notorious missing persons cases, it emerged last night.

For 46 years, the disappearance and suspected murder of a 12-year-old Lanarkshire girl, Moira Anderson, has gone unsolved. The Coatbridge schoolgirl went missing on 23 February, 1957, after she was caught in a blizzard while running an errand to the shops.

She was last seen boarding a bus which was being driven by a convicted paedophile, Alexander Gartshore, now 82, who has always denied any involvement in her disappearance and who was cleared in a police investigation.

But last night it emerged that another convicted paedophile, James Gallogley, a close friend of Gartshore, who was himself jailed for ten years in 1997 for abusing five schoolgirls in Coatbridge in the 1970s, had written a statement implicating Gartshore in Moira’s murder.

In a 15-page written confession, recorded shortly before he died of cancer in prison in 1999, Gallogley claims that before her death Moira was taken back to the Baxters Bus depot in Coatbridge, where she was abused by Gartshore and an unnamed accomplice.

In the statement, dictated to his cellmate, Alec Keil, Gallogley states: "On that date, I met my friend Alex Gartshore, who informed me that he had wee Moira up at the garage. Someone else was there and had abused her also, but she was heavily sedated with chloroform and she was in and out of consciousness."

Mr Keil, who was recently released from prison, has handed the document to Strathclyde Police. It is understood any renewed investigation into the case would focus closely on the Tarry Burn in Coatbridge, where Gallogley claims that Gartshore disposed of the schoolgirl’s body.

Last night, Detective Chief Inspector Les Darling confirmed that Strathclyde Police would treat the new allegations seriously.

This article: http://news.scotsman.com/glasgow.cfm?id=1132762003

Last updated: 13-Oct-03 01:46 GMT

monkalup - February 14, 2007 08:43 PM (GMT)
http://news.scotsman.com/scotland.cfm?id=1410532006
Documents may unravel mystery of missing girl
KATRINE BUSSEY

DOCUMENTS relating to the disappearance of a schoolgirl nearly 50 years ago could soon be released under Freedom of Information laws.

Kevin Dunion, the Scottish Information Commissioner, has received a request to release documents relating to the unsolved case of 11-year-old Moira Anderson.

The youngster went missing from her home in Coatbridge, Lanarkshire, in February 1957, while running an errand for her grandmother.

Her body has never been found, but family and friends are convinced she was abducted and murdered.

A spokeswoman for the Scottish Information Commission said a decision on whether the documents should be released would be made shortly but could not confirm reports that the papers included a detailed description of the girl's death.

The document being considered described how the schoolgirl was sedated and sexually abused before being dumped in a burn.

It is also reported that the document named members of an alleged paedophile ring, including senior police officers and members of the Crown Office and former Scottish Office.

The document was written by James Gallogley, a former friend of Alex Gartshore - the paedophile who was named by his own daughter Sandra Brown as Moira's killer.

Strathclyde Police submitted a report to the procurator-fiscal in 2004 after Gallogley made a deathbed confession in which he claimed Gartshore had killed the youngster before dumping her body in a burn.

The commissioner could order the police force to release the document.

The spokeswoman said: "We cannot confirm precisely when this decision will be issued, but I can confirm the decision is in the closing stages."

Brown, from Edinburgh, claimed in her book Where There Is Evil that her father was responsible for the murder.

She has also set up the Moira Anderson Foundation, which works to help families cope with incidents of sexual abuse.

Brown received an OBE in the Queen's birthday honours this year for services to child protection in Scotland.

This article: http://news.scotsman.com/scotland.cfm?id=1410532006

Last updated: 23-Sep-06 23:56 GMT

monkalup - February 14, 2007 08:46 PM (GMT)
http://news.scotsman.com/scotland.cfm?id=1350952006

Reid urged to release 'paedophile' dossier
TANYA THOMPSON
SOCIAL AFFAIRS CORRESPONDENT
CAMPAIGNERS involved in one of Scotland's most enduring murder mysteries have written to the Home Secretary in an attempt to force police to release a secret dossier identifying members of a paedophile ring.

Friends and family of Moira Anderson, the schoolgirl who disappeared from her Lanarkshire home nearly 50 years ago, want John Reid to review a decision by Strathclyde Police not to reveal the document.

It is claimed that in the dossier, James Gallogley, a convicted paedophile who died in Peterhead prison in 1999, confessed to helping dispose of Moira's body and implicated senior public figures in the abuse of children in Strathclyde during the 1950s and 1960s.

Last night, Sandra Brown, the founder of the Moira Anderson Foundation, said it was crucial that the file be made public. "We have written to the Home Secretary in the hope he will intervene," she said.

"We want to see the file and Gallogley's confession. It has the names of those allegedly involved in the paedophile ring but also refers to the location of Moira's body."

According to Ms Brown, who has spoken to former police officers involved in the investigation, the dossier describes how Moira, 11, was abducted, subdued with chloroform, sexually abused and dumped in the Tarry Burn in Coatbridge. Ms Brown believes her late father, Alex Gartshore, was also responsible for the crime.

Gallogley, a disgraced church elder and one of Gartshore's closest friends, was jailed for ten years at the High Court in Glasgow in August 1997 for abusing five girls in Coatbridge.

Moira Anderson was last seen boarding a bus in her home town of Coatbridge in 1957. A police investigation into her disappearance has been all but closed, although her body has never been found.


oldies4mari2004 - March 24, 2008 06:13 PM (GMT)
user posted image

Moira Anderson
Missing since February 23, 1957 from Coatbridge, Scotland, United Kingdom.
Classification: Endangered Missing



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Vital Statistics

Date Of Birth: March 31, 1944
Age at Time of Disappearance: 12 years old
Height and Weight at Time of Disappearance: 5'3"; 113 lbs.
Clothing: A fawn-coloured kilted burberry coat, a blue winter scarf, a blue jumper, a lemon-coloured cardigan, a thick tweed skirt, fawn socks, brown shoes and a navy-blue woollen pixie hat with red bands.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Circumstances of Disappearance
Anderson went missing on 23 February, 1957, after she was caught in a blizzard while running an errand to the shops.



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Investigators
If you have any information concerning this case, please contact:

Coatbridge Police Office
01236 502019
E-Mail

Source Information:
"No Final Solution" by Douglas Skelton
The Scotsman

oldies4mari2004 - March 24, 2008 06:16 PM (GMT)

monkalup - March 29, 2008 04:19 PM (GMT)


Legal move to open grave 'where body of girl victim is hidden'

View GalleryBy Michael Howie Home Affairs Correspondent
Family wins backing to exhume coffins in search for sister who disappeared without trace 50 years ago
MORE than 50 years ago, Moira Anderson vanished on a snowy February evening as she set off to the local Co-op store to buy butter for her grandmother.

Despite a police hunt, the bubbly 11-year-old tomboy has not been seen since she boarded a bus on her way to the shop, and no-one has ever been convicted of her suspected abduction and murder.

But a breakthrough in the case yesterday appeared to be close after it emerged that Moira's surviving family have won legal backing to search a graveyard where they think she is buried.

It also emerged that police have asked relatives for a DNA sample to be compared with any body that is recovered.

Moira's sisters, Janet Hart and Marjorie Muir, believe that her remains lie hidden in a graveyard in Lanarkshire near where she disappeared.

An excavation organised by the family at the cemetery has already revealed evidence from ground-penetrating radar that suggests Moira's body may be located within a plot among three coffins – one of which was buried there just weeks after the little girl vanished.

The probe stalled, however, because the family cannot move the coffins without a court warrant to see whether their suspicions are correct.

But now their hopes have been raised after lawyers agreed to help a private investigation led by the family. Speaking from her home in Australia, Mrs Hart, 64, said: "I really hope that this brings the closure so denied to us for 51 years.

"It's not too much to ask that my little sister, Moira, have her final resting place not in an unmarked grave, or in someone else's grave, but with her loving parents who grieved for their lost daughter daily, until they too were laid to rest.

"I have hopes that Scottish justice will prevail, too late for Moira's murderer to be charged, but for Moira to be found and placed with her parents."

In 2003, a deathbed confession by a paedophile came to light, raising hopes that Moira's ghost would be laid to rest.

The confession outlined a wider paedophile ring said to include senior public figures. But the document has never been made public – fuelling claims of a cover-up.

Sandra Brown, campaigner and family friend, is convinced her late father, the convicted paedophile, Alexander Gart-shore, murdered the schoolgirl.

Ms Brown, 59, who now lives in Edinburgh, said: "It is my belief that she is tucked beneath the coffin of a gentleman who died three weeks after her abduction."

At the time of Moira's disappearance, in 1957, Gartshore, who is believed to have been driving the bus which Moira boarded, was on bail after being arrested over the rape of his family's 13-year-old babysitter.

In 1992, officers questioned him but he denied any involvement and charges were never brought. He died in 2006.

The deathbed statement by Gartshore's friend and fellow convicted paedophile, James Gallogley, is understood to have alleged Gartshore sedated Moira before abusing her and leaving her in his bus, where she died "from the cold".

CHILLING CONFESSION AT A FAMILY FUNERAL
SANDRA Brown, a childhood neighbour of Moira Anderson and a campaigner against child abuse, last night said she hoped the 51-year-old mystery was close to an end.

Ms Brown created the Moira Anderson Foundation eight years ago with the proceeds from the book Where There is Evil, which she wrote after discovering that her father was a paedophile.

It was at a family funeral, 27 years after Moira vanished, that Ms Brown's estranged father, Alexander Gartshore, was said to have confessed to her that he had been involved in the girl's disappearance.

Responding to the news that Strathclyde Police has requested a DNA sample from relatives, she told The Scotsman: "I welcome any developments that are going to take this forward. It's been 51 years for Moira's family and so closure would be welcome."

In 2006 Ms Brown was made an OBE for services to child protection in Scotland.



The full article contains 698 words and appears in The Scotsman newspaper.Last Updated: 26 March 2008 12:04 AM
http://thescotsman.scotsman.com/scotland/L...rave.3912915.jp

monkalup - March 29, 2008 06:19 PM (GMT)


Copyright 2008 MGN Ltd.
All Rights Reserved

The Mirror

March 26, 2008 Wednesday
Tyne-Tees Edition

NEWS; Pg. 33

143 words


MISSING GIRL HUNT IN GRAVE

BY MAGGIE BARRY


THE family of a schoolgirl who disapeared more than 50 years ago are applying for an exhumation order in the hope of finally finding her body.

Moira Anderson's sisters Janet Hart and Marjorie Muir believe the remains of the 11-year-old lie hidden in a graveyard in Lanarkshire, Scotland.

Ground penetrating radar suggests a body may lie between three coffins.

Speaking from her home in Australia, 64-year-old Mrs Hart said: "I really hope that this brings the closure so denied to us for 51 years."

Police have asked the sisters for a DNA sample.

Campaigner Sandra Brown is convinced her late father, paedophile Alexander Gartshore, murdered Moira in 1957.

The girl was last seen in Coatbridge getting on a bus he was driving.

Mrs Brown, 59, of Edinburgh, said: "It is my belief that she is tucked beneath the coffin of a man who died three weeks after her abduction."

SIGHTING: Moira

March 26, 2008
http://www6.lexisnexis.com/publisher/EndUs...10194&start=131

tammani - October 1, 2008 05:09 PM (GMT)
Hi, my only reason for registering on this site is that I have nagging thoughts that I may or may not have a signifficane to this case.

Some years ago the Sunday Mail ran a story on it and there was a referance to the fact that he or a peodofile ring may have trawled different parts of Scotland "looking" for a potenial "victim". At the time I would be about 7 and 1/2 when Moira Anderson went missing. When reading the report in the paper I remembered an incident that still haunts me to this very day.

My dad also a bus driver at the time on his way to work (I think he was back shift or on a split day shift) passed me and my younger brother sitting in the back of this car parked outside of a friend of mine's front gate and he banged on the window of the car demanding to know why we were in his car, he opened the door and ordered us out and told us to get home and as we were doing so I saw him almost phisically try to pull the guy out but he drove off at speed.

I also remember the ploy used to get me into his car, I can also remember how he looked to me at the time. He was only after me and not really my brother. We were playing around outside my friends gate because I was going to see if she was comming out to play with us when the car pulled up. He asked me when the chip van was due, I told him that it was due around 5pm and he said "oh dear, that 's a wee while yet, would you like a bag of chip's when he comes?" You could wait inside the car until he comes, I said that I would but he would have to get a bag of chips for my brother too, and he will have to get in the car as well as I was supposed to be looking after him ( my mum had 2 year old twins and we were only 3 doors away from our house). He was not happy and asked if he could go home, I told him my mum was busy and I was sent out with him and that my two other older brothers were off to the play park and he wasn't allowed to go with them, and he reluctantly allowed him to enter the car. He waited for a short time rubbing his chin and biting his lower lip while wiating. I got restless and said I wanted me and my brother go home when I noticed my dad walking up, he was going for a bus to the depot for his shift. I knocked on the window to get his attention and the man swung round and said "no don't do that," I said "but I'm just waving to my dad. I got an awfull roilliking from my dad when he got home that night.

It must have been around April 1957 as I was off school and so were my brothers, so it must have been the Easter holidays, not long after Miora Anderson went missing, so my dad would have had that playing on his mind when he spotted us. But the problem for me in this, was, that we stayed in a small village in Kennoway Fife about 3/4 miles from Leven and 2 miles from Buckhaven, quite a long, long, way away from where Miora Anderson was taken. I can also remember that we were wearing clothes for a cooler but not cold weather.

This has haunted me for such a long time ever since I read that report in the Sunday Mail and wondered if I could have been another victim or was he really waitng for "the chip van".

This recollection is genuine and not made up.

monkalup - October 5, 2008 06:52 PM (GMT)
Wow! First let me say welcome to Porchlight. I think you are right to be suspicious of this man and his way too apparent interest in you. I think our instincts should be listened to, and your dad reacted in a way his instincts told him to do. This is not an uncommon ploy, I think, along with the lost puppy, see my new kitten "let me show you this, little girl" these creeps use. Even scarier are the number of children who are molested or killed by their own families, much less the stranger/danger guys. Thank goodness you were safely away from him before more harm was done. (hugs) to you! and thanks for posting your story.

conah1991 - October 9, 2008 10:15 AM (GMT)
Hi having read Sandra Brown's book Where There is Evil I was stunned to find my uncle was at one time considered the No1 suspect. My uncle was Ian Simpson who lived in Coatbridge at the time (I never met him). To be honest I was sickened not because of a will to protect a family member but because of the proximity of the alleged abduction and Moira's apparent destination (Kirkwood area of coatbridge) my father and his family lived there only a few hundred yards from where Moira's apparent final destination. I believe the poor girl was abducted and murdered but I wish to know why my uncle was so linked. He did have a strong alibi (he was reputedly away that weekend with the territorial army) but why was he linked at all? By the way he was not mentally handicapped as mentioned in Ms Browns book he was a diagnosed pyschopath! I know my aunt Shiela lived close by to the Co-op that Moiras first destination to by cooking fat for her uncles fish and that my uncle Ian frequented there. Believe me it is not my desire to defend my uncle but to allay worries of any of my families involvement. My father also lived in the area at the time and left to come and live here in Fleetwood Lancashire shortly after this tragic girls disappearance! I hope Moira was not sent on errand that would easily have tempted her to Kirkwood by someone. My uncle did go on to murder two people (the family remains convinced that fathers involvement was more than a passing one in these two murders) and was killed along with a male nurse and policeman in the Carstairs breakout of 1976. Far from being mentally handicapped (and what does that mean today) Ian Simpson went on to gain a BA Honours degree whilst in Carstairs demonstrating that he had above average intelligence! I hope the confession of the convicted paedophile Gallogley is true as I will rest easier. What concerns me is that Gartshore (Sandra Browns Father) adamantly maintained his innocence to the end (or did he and will Sandra Brown eventually tell all)? I do really hope that Sandra Brown is right in her convictions of her fathers complicity to Moira's disappearance and that he has confessed but my niggling doubts remain. What also concerns me is that the police at the time seemed to paralysed with a self induced inertia for whatever reason comparable with the Bible John murders in Glasgow and remain over protective of their reputation in failing to solve these high profile cases My father wrote a book on the Bible John murders and his belief that he knew the killers identity. As a matter of interest I have not seen my father for over a decade because of his psychotic drink induced behaviour he left my mum to fend on her own with four kids in the sixties! I fully respect Sandra Brown and all she stands for and the heartache she must have endured in making her disclosures so publicly. What I do hope is that though Sandra's beliefs are genuine a smoke screen has not been created for other possible suspects. My families prayers are for Moira Anderson in particular and her families pain and a hope that this whole tragic scenario can be laid to rest with the finding of Moira's remains someday and that the truth will out.

braveheart - October 9, 2008 03:33 PM (GMT)
Hello, and Welcome to Porchlight!
I have always found this case to be fascinating. There is a thread here about some of the story.
http://z13.invisionfree.com/PorchlightEuro...topic=2874&st=0
I appreciate you sharing your story and your thoughts. After all these years, it sure would be nice to be able to bring Moira home. I have not read the book and this is the first mention I have heard of your uncle. It does sound like the author is "stretching" maybe to add additinal "suspects"? Things like that just muddy the water, IMHO. Peace to you and your family.

monkalup - October 9, 2008 05:09 PM (GMT)
I am very glad to have you join us! Welcome to the group! I think you will find it a friendly group. This is a most interesting case.

monkalup - October 9, 2008 06:44 PM (GMT)
Moira on Scotland thread
http://z13.invisionfree.com/PorchlightEuro...topic=404&st=0&

It sure would be nice to be able to read those documents the articles refer to.

monkalup - October 9, 2008 06:55 PM (GMT)
Do you know if anything ever came of this? I always wonder if they were successful.


QUOTE
Copyright 2008 MGN Ltd.
All Rights Reserved

The Mirror

March 26, 2008 Wednesday
Tyne-Tees Edition

NEWS; Pg. 33

143 words


MISSING GIRL HUNT IN GRAVE

BY MAGGIE BARRY


THE family of a schoolgirl who disapeared more than 50 years ago are applying for an exhumation order in the hope of finally finding her body.

Moira Anderson's sisters Janet Hart and Marjorie Muir believe the remains of the 11-year-old lie hidden in a graveyard in Lanarkshire, Scotland.

Ground penetrating radar suggests a body may lie between three coffins.

Speaking from her home in Australia, 64-year-old Mrs Hart said: "I really hope that this brings the closure so denied to us for 51 years."

Police have asked the sisters for a DNA sample.

Campaigner Sandra Brown is convinced her late father, paedophile Alexander Gartshore, murdered Moira in 1957.

The girl was last seen in Coatbridge getting on a bus he was driving.

Mrs Brown, 59, of Edinburgh, said: "It is my belief that she is tucked beneath the coffin of a man who died three weeks after her abduction."

SIGHTING: Moira

March 26, 2008
http://www6.lexisnexis.com/publisher/EndUs...10194&start=131

monkalup - November 5, 2008 01:06 PM (GMT)
http://www.theherald.co.uk/news/other/disp...1411309.0.0.php



Files on Moira Anderson to remain closedLUCY ADAMS, Chief Reporter May 19 2007
Comment | Read Comments (19)Documents relating to the disappearance of a schoolgirl nearly 50 years ago will not be released following a decision by the Scottish Freedom of Information Commissioner.

Kevin Dunion has declined a request to release the files on the unsolved case of 11-year-old Moira Anderson.

The youngster went missing in Coatbridge, Lanarkshire, in 1957, after going on a shopping errand.

advertisement
Moira's body has never been found but many believe she was abducted and murdered.

The documents are believed to contain a confession by James Gallogley, claiming that his former friend Alex Gartshore had killed the girl before dumping her body in a spot called Tarry Burn.

The ruling of the commissioner is expected to influence future decisions not to release material from unsolved cases. He said he could not release the sensitive personal information contained in private police statements.

Sandra Brown, Gartshore's daughter, has stated that she believes her father murdered Moira, and backed the calls for disclosure.

In 2004 Strathclyde Police submitted a report to the procurator-fiscal after Gallogley made the deathbed confession from his prison cell. Gartshore and Gallogley are now both dead.

Mr Dunion's decision states: "I know that my refusal to accede to this request will be very disappointing to family members and to friends who, understandably, are desperate to solve the mystery of Moira Anderson's disappearance.

"However, that would not justify setting aside the privacy to which those making statements to the police are entitled to expect. Nor can I justify the real damage to the integrity of conducting police investigations which would entail."



alg - February 24, 2009 01:21 PM (GMT)
Does anyone know of any child murders in Coatbridge around this time
and up to 1963 ?


monkalup - February 25, 2009 02:15 AM (GMT)
QUOTE (alg @ Feb 24, 2009 - 08:21 AM)
Does anyone know of any child murders in Coatbridge around this time
and up to 1963 ?

Welcome to Porchlight, happy to have you join us.

I'm afraid I do not know of additional cases, offhand, but we tend to focus on missing persons rather than murder cases. Have you checked websleuths? They do a lot of cold cases there

http://www.websleuths.com/forums/index.php

I will look around and see what I find elsewhere. Welcome to the group!

monkalup - February 25, 2009 02:16 AM (GMT)
52 years on, family of missing Moira Anderson's believe they know where she's buried
Feb 23 2009 By Mark McGivern

THE FAMILY of schoolgirl Moira Anderson want to open a grave where they believe her body was secretly buried.

The disappearance of the 11-year-old - exactly 52 years ago today - is one of Scotland's longest-running mysteries.

No trace of Moira was ever found - but it is widely accepted that she was abducted, probably by a paedophile, who murdered her then disposed of her body.

Moira disappeared on February 23, 1957, after being sent on an errand to the local Co-op in Coatbridge, Lanarkshire, by her grandmother.

In recent years, evidence has emerged suggesting Moira's remains may have been hidden in a grave at a cemetery near her home.

Now her relatives have instructed lawyers to formally seek permission for an investigation of the site.

A sheriff will be asked to grant an exhumation order for a plot at Old Monkland Cemetery, close to where Moira disappeared.

Prime suspect for Moira's abduction and murder is paedophile Alexander Gartshore, who worked as a bus driver near the schoolgirl's home.

Gartshore, now dead, was named as Moira's killer in a deathbed confession by a fellow convicted child abuser.

Gartshore's daughter Sandra Brown has investigated Moira's case for decades and believes the little girl's remains will be uncovered in the next month.

She has already written a book outlining how her pervert father almost certainly murdered the schoolgirl.

Yesterday, Sandra, 60, said: "I don't want to talk about this too prematurely but I believe that there may be closure on the issue of Moira's death for her family.

"The details will emerge soon but it wouldn't be fair to discuss matters beyond that at this stage."

Sandra told last year how she believed Moira's body was somehow hidden beneath the coffin of a man who died three weeks after her abduction.

Last March, it emerged that relatives of Moira had provided items to be used in compiling a DNA sample for comparison.

Moira's sisters, Janet Hart and Marjorie Muir, also believe that her remains lie hidden in the graveyard.

Tests are already understood to have revealed an unknown body may be located within a plot among three coffins - one of which was buried there just weeks after Moira vanished.

The action which will be raised by the sisters at Airdrie Sheriff Court seeks permission to move those coffins.

The next of kin of the people buried there have already been approached and it is understood they have given permission for the lair to be disturbed.

The complex legal process to obtain an exhumation order involves a solicitor obtaining a feasibility certificate and then establishing where any body would be re-interred.

The sheriff then has to issue a warrant to allow the physical removal of remains.

If they were found to be Moira's, the sheriff would also have to allow permission for her to be re-interred next to her parents.

Moves to seek an exhumation have been hampered for two years.

Lawyers have been reluctant to take on such a complex case.

A further obstacle emerged after Sandra Brown brought in psychics, who "confirmed" that Moira had been abused and murdered by three paedophiles.

One legal source said: "Rather than embellish the case, the involvement of clairvoyants took the investigation into the realm of mumbo-jumbo somewhat.

"There is not a lawyer alive who would wish to rest on the claims of someone presenting their 'psychic' claims as hard evidence in court.

"if Moira's remains are not found by an exhumation at Old Monkland, it is unlikely the case will ever be resolved."

The case surrounding Moira was sparked into life after revelations suggested pervert James Gallogley, a friend of Gartshore, had penned a 15-page "confession" to killing Moira.

The 1999 document claimed Gartshore and another man killed Moira.

At the time of Moira's disappearance, Gartshore, who is believed to have been driving a bus which Moira boarded, was on bail after being arrested over the rape of his family's 13-year-old babysitter.

In 1992, officers questioned him but he denied any involvement and charges were never brought. He died in 2006.

The alleged deathbed statement by Gallogley claimed Gartshore sedated Moira before abusing her and leaving her in his bus, where she died "from the cold". Her body was then allegedly dumped in the Tarry Burn in Coatbridge.

Sandra Brown fought to have the alleged confession document, held by Strathclyde Police, made public but has so far been unsuccessful.

A copy of the document was handed over to the Record's sister paper the Sunday Mail in 2006. That led to experts condemning the confession as a hoax.

The file named notorious killers Robert Black, Fred West and Thomas Hamilton as part of a sex ring along with judges, policemen and other public figures.

One senior police source said the only name it lacked was that of Peter Sutcliffe, the Yorkshire Ripper.

The confession's authenticity was further tainted by the efforts of pervert Alexander Keil, who claimed to be Gallogley's ex-cellmate, to sell it for £20,000. In 2005, a dig was held at the Tarry Burn. No body was found.

Speaking from her home in Australia, Janet Hart, 64, said: "I really hope that this brings the closure so denied to us for 51 years.

"It's not too much to ask that my little sister, Moira, have her final resting place not in an unmarked grave, or in someone else's grave, but with her loving parents who grieved for their lost daughter daily, until they too were laid to rest.

"I have hopes that Scottish justice will prevail, too late for Moira's murderer to be charged, but for Moira to be found and placed with her parents."

http://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/news/scottish...86908-21145615/

alg - June 6, 2009 10:36 AM (GMT)
I asked in a previous question if anyone was aware of any other children going missing around the time up to 1960.
Having not recieved any positive replies I will assume that none did.
My reason for asking the question was that I was about 3 or 4 years old (1960 or 61) and had gone with my grandfather to visit his sister in Coatbridge on the way back to get the bus back to Bellshill we crossed a footbridge over a canal and as we did so he told me how a child had been murdered and their body thrown into the canal.
That was something that has stuck with me to date but I didn't put any great significance on it.
Murders in those days made front pages of the National tabloids.
My grandfather was Alexander Gartshore father of Alexander Gartshore my cousin Sandra's father.

monkalup - June 26, 2010 03:46 PM (GMT)
I have not found any other local area children missing during this time. I keep looking though. It is hard to find infoon older cases sometimes if they are not already well known at the time...

Sandera - January 10, 2011 05:21 PM (GMT)
Hi there,

Does anyone have a copy or know where I can view online or otherwise the Dispatches programme of 2000 about Moiras disappearance?

Have just read Where There is Evil and sent off for DVD One of Our Ain. Any info greatly received.


Thanks

Sandra

monkalup - January 26, 2011 05:56 AM (GMT)
I'm sorry. I wish I did. I wonder if Public Radio International has done any features?

monkalup - February 24, 2011 02:54 PM (GMT)
http://www.thescottishsun.co.uk/scotsol/ho...-for-Moira.html

Grave bid in search for Moira

By GERRY DUFFY

Published: 23 Feb 2011
THE family of a missing schoolgirl will today find out if they can exhume a grave thought to hold her body - 54 YEARS after her suspected murder.

Moira Anderson's loved ones are expected to get the go-ahead from Crown Office officials to dig up the plot after relatives of others buried there gave their blessing.

It is thought 11-year-old Moira's body was hidden in the grave under a man's coffin.

Sister Janet, 67, who lives abroad, said: "It can't happen quickly enough for me."

The prime suspect in her murder was child rapist Alexander Gartshore, a bus driver near her hometown of Coatbridge, Lanarkshire, who died five years ago. But Moira's family have never given up looking for her.

She vanished on an errand in February 1957. Last night the Crown Office said it was "liaising" with the family. North Lanarkshire Council said it would help "in every way possible".

gerryduffy@the-sun.co.uk

Read more: http://www.thescottishsun.co.uk/scotsol/ho...l#ixzz1Et8vS5xm

monkalup - July 22, 2012 02:15 AM (GMT)
Schoolgirl Moira Anderson's disappearance to be treated as murder case
Jul 21 2012 Exclusive by Janice Burns


moira anderson Image 2

THE disappearance of schoolgirl Moira Anderson is to be finally treated as a murder case – 55 years after she failed to return home.

Her family want police to exhume the grave of a friend of the killer, where they believe she may have been hidden.

In a dramatic move, prosecutors have ordered cold case detectives to reopen the case as a homicide rather than a missing persons inquiry.

Lord Advocate Frank Mulholland yesterday broke the news to her family, campaigners the Moira Anderson Foundation and local MSP Alex Neil.

Moira, of Coatbridge, vanished on a trip to the shops in a blizzard on February 23, 1957, only five weeks before her 12th birthday.

Strathclyde Police Serious Crime Review Team, set up last month to probe unsolved murders, have been told to put Moira’s case at the top of their list.

The decision was welcomed by Moira’s family, who hope they will get the go-ahead to exhume a grave where they believe her body is hidden within the next six weeks.

Moira’s sister Janet Hart, 68, who lives in Sydney, Australia, said: “I am shell-shocked that after 55 years Moira’s case is now being treated seriously as a murder inquiry instead of just a missing person.

“I am praying this is the last hurdle before we get some kind of closure and finally find out what happened to Moira.

“Nothing will ever bring her back but this latest development is hugely encouraging.”

The family believe Moira’s body is hidden in the same grave as an old pal of a man suspected of killing her.

The prime suspect was child rapist Alexander Gartshore, a bus driver who died six years ago.


Just days after she disappeared, a grave was dug for one of Gartshore’s friends and he is said to have joked that the dead man had done him “a big favour”.

Gartshore was exposed as the likely killer by his own daughter, Sandra Brown.

She wrote a remarkable book, Where There is Evil, accusing him of the murder.

She used proceeds from the sales to help set up the Moira Anderson Foundation, who support families affected by child sexual abuse.

Gartshore was the driver of a bus the schoolgirl boarded on her final outing and the last man known to have seen her alive.

His friend and fellow child sex abuser James Gallogley, who died in Peterhead prison in 1999, told an inmate that Gartshore and another man sexually abused Moira at the bus depot after subduing her with chloroform.

Gallogley claimed Moira’s death was not deliberate and the killers did not know what to do with the body.

Sandra said: “For five years we have been fighting to get the exhumation of the grave since a radar survey that indicated there was a possibility of an unauthorised burial.

“I have not rested in the fight to get the truth about what happened and finally the Lord Advocate and the police are taking this case seriously and treating it as a murder case.

“The meeting with the Lord Advocate was very positive and very encouraging.

“For years, this case has been treated as a missing persons case but what has just happened is that there has now been a move in the status of the case from missing persons to murder.

“Even that piece of news alone will be very encouraging to Moira’s sisters.

“It feels that for the past 55 years it has been an uphill struggle to convince the authorities that this is a serious murder case rather than just missing persons.

“There hasn’t really been huge enthusiasm for this case for years and it is thanks to local councillor Michael Coyle and MSP Alex Neil, who have been very proactive in pushing for this to be reopened.”


Neil said: “I asked the Lord Advocate for a meeting to discuss progress because clearly people in Lanarkshire are keen, despite the passage of all these years, to find out what happened to Moira Anderson.

“Obviously, with the kind of forensics we have now there might be the possibilty of getting answers that weren’t possible even five or 10 years ago.

“The Lord Advocate told them he was referring the case to the new cold case review unit, which means that it will be properly investigated as a homicide instead of a missing persons case and the police will carry out a full investigation.

“It is very good news for the family and anyone who knew Moira.

“Because this is now being treated very seriously as a homicide, the chances of getting the answers that people have been waiting all these years for are increased.

“We shouldn’t underestimate the scale of the challenge and it is a tribute to the Lord Advocate that he is prepared to put these resources in to find out what happened after all those years.”

Coyle, a councillor in Airdrie, said: “This is a case that has been close to my heart and the hearts of everyone in the local area for years.

“I am delighted that the Lord Advocate and the police are now taking this case seriously and investigating it a murder.”

A Crown Office spokesman said: “The Lord Advocate met representatives of the Moira Anderson Foundation.

“The Lord Advocate confirmed that the case will now be dealt with by the COPFS cold case review unit.

“COPFS understand that the Moira Anderson Foundation now intend to petition to the court for exhumation of a burial site.

“COPFS will liaise with the foundation in relation to their petition.”

http://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/news/scottish...86908-23910832/

monkalup - July 22, 2012 02:18 AM (GMT)
http://www.scotsman.com/scotland-on-sunday...rs-on-1-2425724
By RORY REYNOLDS
Published on Sunday 22 July 2012 00:00


DETECTIVES are to reinvestigate the disappearance of a schoolgirl more than 55 years ago in a case being treated as murder for the first time.


Lord Advocate Frank Mulholland has instructed a cold case team to look into the death of Moira Anderson, who vanished in a blizzard in February 1957.

Campaigners claim Moira was buried in a freshly dug grave by the bus driver who was linked to the mystery. Her family are now planning to petition a Scottish court to gain permission for the contents of the burial site to be exhumed in the search for her remains.

Moira, 11, had left her home in Coatbridge, North Lanarkshire, and taken a bus to the local shops but was never seen again. Driver Alexander Gartshore was the last person to see her alive after she boarded his bus.

He was imprisoned for raping a 12-year-old babysitter two months later and though arrested in 1993 over Moira’s disappearance, was released due to lack of evidence.

The Lord Advocate spoke last week to Moira’s family and campaigners, including Central Scotland MSP Alex Neil, who fought to have the case reopened. Strathclyde Police Serious Crime Review Team, set up in June 2011 to examine unsolved murders, has been asked to make the case a 
priority.

Moira’s sister Janet Hart, 68, who lives in Sydney, Australia, said: “I am shell-shocked that, after 55 years, Moira’s case is now being treated seriously as a murder inquiry instead of just a missing person.

“I am praying this is the last hurdle before we get some kind of closure and finally find out what happened to Moira.

“Nothing will ever bring her back but this latest development is hugely encouraging.”

The family believe Moira’s body is hidden in the same grave as a friend of prime suspect, Gartshore. He died in Leeds in 2006, aged 85.

In the days after Moira’s disappearance, a grave was dug for one of Gartshore’s friends and he is said to have joked that the dead man had done him “a big favour”.

Gartshore was exposed as the likely killer by his own daughter, Sandra Brown.

She wrote a book, Where There Is Evil, published in 1998, accusing him of the 
murder.

Brown used proceeds from the sales to help set up the Moira Anderson Foundation, which supports families affected by child sexual abuse.

Gartshore’s friend, James Gallogley, who was convicted of child sex offences in 1997 and died in Peterhead prison in 1999, told an inmate that Gartshore and another man sexually abused Anderson at the bus depot after subduing her with chloroform.

Before his death, Gallogley wrote a 15-page confession claiming her death was not ­deliberate and the killers did not know what to do with the body, before detailing where it had been buried.

In 2005, a dig was held on the spot where Gallogley claimed Moira was buried, and although no body was found a separate search of another area by radar suggested the schoolgirl’s remains may be buried in the same grave as Gartshore’s friend.

Sandra Brown said: “For five years we have been fighting to get the exhumation of the grave since a radar survey that indicated there was a possibility of an unauthorised burial.

“I have not rested in the fight to get the truth about what happened and finally the Lord Advocate and the police are taking this case seriously and treating it as a murder case.

“For years, this case has been treated as a missing persons case but what has just happened is that there has now been a move in the status of the case from missing persons to murder.

“It feels that for the past 55 years it has been an uphill struggle to convince the authorities that this is a serious murder case. There hasn’t really been huge enthusiasm for this case for years and it is thanks to local councillor Michael Coyle and MSP Alex Neil, who have been very proactive in pushing for this to be reopened.”

Yesterday Alex Neil, MSP for Central Scotland, said the developments were “a big breakthrough in the Moira Anderson case and it is significant it is being treated as murder, and not still a missing persons investigation. The new cold case unit only deal with murders and this will finally be investigated properly.

“I’m delighted that this Lord Advocate has done what no previous one has done about this case.”

He added: “With the kind of forensics we have now there might be the possibility of getting answers that weren’t possible even five or ten years ago.”

A Crown Office spokesman said: “The Lord Advocate confirmed that the case will now be dealt with by the COPFS cold case review unit. COPFS understand that the Moira Anderson Foundation now intends to petition to the court for exhumation of a burial site.

“COPFS will liaise with the foundation in relation to their petition.”


Timeline: from missing to murder


Feb 23, 1957: Moira Anderson, 11, vanishes after boarding a bus in Coatbridge. Driver Alex Gartshore is the last person to see her alive.

April 18, 1957: Gartshore is imprisoned for 18 months for raping a 12-year-old babysitter.

Oct, 1965: Gartshore leaves his wife for a bus conductress and moves to Leeds.

Feb, 1992: Gartshore’s daughter Sandra Brown confronts him about Moira. He denies murder.

March, 1993: Gartshore is arrested in Leeds but released due to lack of evidence.

Aug, 1997: Gartshore’s friend James Gallogley, 66, is jailed for child sex offences in Glasgow.

Feb, 1998: Brown publishes Where There Is Evil, naming her father as Anderson’s killer.

April, 1999: Gallogley writes a 15-page deathbed confession admitting he, Gartshore, and another man killed Anderson.

March, 2005: Dig is held, but no body found.

April, 2006: Gartshore dies aged 85, telling Brown: “I regret everything to do with Moira” but not admitting guilt.

Sep, 2007: Radar examination of existing grave suggests her remains are there. Five-year family battle for exhumation of the grave.

July 2012: Lord Advocate switches case from missing person to murder investigation, with the new cold case squad to re-examine it.

» rory.reynolds@scotlandonsunday.com


tatertot - January 10, 2013 02:23 PM (GMT)
http://www.scotsman.com/news/scottish-news...humed-1-2728960

Moira Anderson remains not found after grave exhumed
Published on Thursday 10 January 2013 12:17

THE remains of Moira Anderson, the schoolgirl who went missing more than 50 years ago, have not been found following the exhumation of a grave in North Lanarkshire.

The case remains unsolved, although convicted paedophile Alexander Gartshore, a Coatbridge bus driver who died in 2006, has been connected with the disappearance.

The family of the youngster, who have long suspected she was murdered by a convicted child rapist, last month successfully raised a legal action before Sheriff Frank Pieri at Airdrie Sheriff Court to exhume eight bodies from a grave where they believe she may have been secretly buried.

Sandra Brown alledges that her late father murdered the schoolgirl and disposed of the body. Brown dubbed Gartshore “every bit as much of a paedophile as Jimmy Savile”.

Investigators excavated the plot of Sinclair Upton, said to have been an acquaintance of Gartshore, to see if the schoolgirl’s remains were hidden there.

Moira Anderson, who was 11 at the time, disappeared in February 1957. She went to a local shop near her home in Coatbridge, and never returned. Her body has never been found.

Mrs Brown, who has been awarded an OBE for her child protection work, said: “My father was every bit as much of a paedophile as Jimmy Savile ever was.

“My sad conclusion is that Moira is not the only child in the central belt of Scotland who suffered this fate. Whether we find her or not, we know we’ve looked. I hope to see results in the next few days.”

Brown, a childhood friend of Anderson, said that she believed a ‘paedophile ring’ was operating in the area at the time, and added that revelations about Jimmy Savile showed that “people are now realising that this is not a modern phenomenon”.

A police spokesman said: “The main objective of the operation this week was to establish if the remains of Moira Anderson, missing from 1957, were within a burial plot in Old Monkland Cemetery.

“Today, Thursday 10 January 2013, Strathclyde Police can confirm that no human remains, other than those already interred at this plot, have been found at this location. Officers have spoken to Moira’s sisters who are fully aware of the outcome and our thoughts are with them at this time.

“Despite today’s outcome, this case will remain open and if any other lines of inquiry are identified they will be fully investigated.”




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