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Title: Your Greatest Custodial fear?
Description: What is yours?


NauvooSaint - October 26, 2011 05:18 AM (GMT)
Is there something that about your position that you would be afraid to happen? Not getting all your work done? An awful unexpected mess? :nerves:

Capt. Midnight - November 22, 2011 04:40 AM (GMT)
Mine is one of those nights when I show up for work and the rest of the crew has called-in sick and I'm left with the nightmare of having to cover 4 other positions besides my own!! toiletdn

NauvooSaint - November 27, 2011 07:12 PM (GMT)
That's a pretty big one. Some custodians are so restricted on time to clean their own areas, that when they are short on co-workers...it can take a couple days to bring their areas back up to their normal maintainable standard. We have 2 night custodians & when 1 is gone (without a sub), we barely have enough time to dustmop halls, clean restrooms & empty trash.

It can be frustrating when you schedule vacation leave or must call-out sick & a substitute not be given. It's like you're being punished for taking time off, because you have to work extra hard to get things back on track upon your return. On a brighter note: I was a sub for a time for a custodian out due to surgery. Her area had gone downhill due to having different subs on a nightly basis & I was able to bring things back up to standard (or better) upon her return. She was dreading coming back not knowing how bad things might be.

Mop Artist - February 19, 2012 07:27 PM (GMT)
"A recent example of person-to-person transmission to hospital personnel
occurred in September and October 2008 when Lujo virus was transmitted from the index patient to a paramedic, 2 nurses, and a member of the janitorial staff."

http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/content/16/3/pdfs/v16-n3.pdf

I used to clean all the push plates and other push and touch areas on all the laboratory and lavatory doors at the lab daily with ammonia water and a terry cloth towel. It wasn't required in my contract, but hey, what's needed is needed!

On my third tour of duty at the lab, the bureaucrats were worried that I would gather up germs from the labs and transfer them to their desks by using the same treated dust cloths used in the labs, so they removed the dusting requirement for offices from the cleaning contract.

Then, some new bureaucrats came in and complained about their dusty offices, and Mark Mora jumped on it like a witch in heat, and ordered my wife to START DUSTING THE OFFICES! So, we started dusting the offices and my company billed the NIH for the additional cleaning time that I hadn't bid on and that wasn't included in my contract price.

I got in a lot of trouble for billing the NIH for the additional work.

Judge Jack Delman ruled that these details were not relevant in my claim because Mark Mora wasn't authorized to give any orders to the cleaning contractor that could affect price or safety. Board Judges - What a buncha dicks!

Mark Mora didn't allow me to launder the terry towels and dust cloths at the RML facility, so I had the choice of using a local laundromat or my home Maytag washer and dryer. When the local laundromat found out what I was washing, they banned me from using their facility. Then, the owner of the laundromat was elected Mayor of Hamilton, MT.

Smart scientists, and smart janitors, push doors open with their clothed shoulders or clothed elbows. (Might be a good idea for all public doors in these times)

"In busy, active institutions such as schools, it is neither practical, nor cost effective to have janitors disinfect doorknobs or multiple user desks though out the day. However, showers and sports changing areas are special places where frequent attention to cleanup and use of diluted bleach or other disinfectant may help reduce spread of MRSA."

http://www.primaryimmune.org/admin_content...RSA_Mar2008.pdf

Mop Artist - February 19, 2012 10:36 PM (GMT)
"Cleaning
Along with being a mild disinfectant, ammonia works well as a de-greaser. It also is used for tough grime in ovens and for cleaning glass windows or appliances. Note that ammonia is always diluted for cleaning, but even then, the fumes can become overwhelming for some people."

Read more: Does Ammonia in Cleaning Products Kill Germs? | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/about_5318882_ammonia-...l#ixzz1mrzFD7FV

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disinfectant

Maybe add some colloidal silver and/or colloidal copper to the mix.

Mop Artist - February 21, 2012 02:35 AM (GMT)
On the other hand, "There's a good bacterial community living in hospitals and if you try to wipe out that good bacterial community with sterilisation agents and excessive antiobiotic use, you actually lay waste to this green field of protective layer, and then these bad bacteria can just jump in and start causing hospital borne infections or mediated infections," Gilbert said."

http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/2012/feb...stem-infections

mpowel10 - January 2, 2013 08:42 PM (GMT)
I work during the daytime at our middle school and my biggest fear is girls not responding to me asking if anyone is in the bathroom. I yell multiple times and sometimes girls can be in the stalls and not even saw a peep. I have started changing a spud-nut on a toilet before and hear a toilet flush a couple of stalls down :oops: . I got to where now I will call the assistant principal down to check the stalls before I even step foot in the restroom.

NauvooSaint - January 6, 2013 02:49 AM (GMT)
I can understand that. I announce myself before entering boy's restrooms too. Even if a student comes in while I'm doing a task, I either tell them to wait outsite a moment or leave. A custodian/staff must be careful to not be placed in a situation that could create a concern.

I had an uncomfortable situation with a special needs girl in the elementary I'm at. She had a habit of always trying to give me a hug. I tried to encourage her to shake hands & fortunately SPED staff was able to assist in training. Custodians are teachers too in the education of students.

Janitoria - January 7, 2013 12:13 AM (GMT)
QUOTE (mpowel10 @ Jan 2 2013, 12:42 PM)
I work during the daytime at our middle school and my biggest fear is girls not responding to me asking if anyone is in the bathroom. I yell multiple times and  sometimes girls can be in the stalls and not even saw a peep. I have started changing a spud-nut on a toilet before and hear a toilet flush a couple of stalls down :oops: . I got to where now I will call the assistant principal down to check the stalls before I even step foot in the restroom.

I'm thinking maybe I'll just get a baseball cap with big bright letters spelling "OOPS" on the front.

I could turn it around backwards after entering, while doing the cleaning tasks.

A person needs to wear personal protection these days.

Janitoria - June 24, 2014 05:43 AM (GMT)
QUOTE (Mop Artist @ Feb 19 2012, 11:27 AM)
"A recent example of person-to-person transmission to hospital personnel
occurred in September and October 2008 when Lujo virus was transmitted from the index patient to a paramedic, 2 nurses, and a member of the janitorial staff."

http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/content/16/3/pdfs/v16-n3.pdf


"Labeling using the universal biohazard symbol is also required for any infectious biological materials in order to prevent accidental exposure to unsuspecting personnel who may be exposed to the biological material (e.g., couriers, administrative staff, and janitors)."

http://www.dehs.umn.edu/bio_pracprin_std_s...ContractCarrier

"CNN reported on Thursday afternoon that 54 CDC employees determined to have been in the labs or hallways at the time live anthrax was present have been seen by the agency’s Occupational Health Clinic. Of those, only two people chose not to take oral antibiotics. An additional 27 staffers have been given the anthrax vaccine. Other exposed individuals were scheduled to be seen by doctors on Friday."

http://www.the-scientist.com//?artic...ed-to-Anthrax/

Janitoria - July 24, 2014 02:40 PM (GMT)
“He’s a scapegoat and everybody knows that,” Kaufman, who was asked to testify at last week’s House hearing on biosecurity issues in government labs, told USA Today. “For [Farrell] to resign as a result of this is an indicator that they’re focusing on who instead of what. It was a culture that led to this issue. It was not an individual,” he told Reuters.

http://www.the-scientist.com/?articles.vie...archer-Resigns/

http://www.the-scientist.com/?articles.vie...on-Biosecurity/




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