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 Gangbusters!, TSR's Cops and Mobsters Game
SBRPG_HakDragon
Posted: Oct 6 2005, 12:00 AM


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Group: Members
Posts: 43
Member No.: 4
Joined: 17-September 05



Anyone remember this one? TSR put out a 1920's to 30's gangsters, private eyes, reporters, and cops game in the early 80's that was simple, fast, and fun. If your were looking for 'hardboiled film noir' it didn't really feel right, but it handled shootouts, car-chases, and sleuthing pretty well. It was kind of like D&D meets 'The Untouchables.'

On a related note, I'm not sure how many people are still interested in the 20s and 30s 'Al Capone' type gangsters genre nowadays - has it become dated, or do people actually think old-time mobsters are still fun? To me, the old black&white serial gangsters are just as fun as other historical period gaming, such as westerns or pirates.

Any thoughts?

-Hak


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SBRPG: The Situation Based Roleplaying Game
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