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 Chavez Will Be Permanent Leader
alive and still talking
Posted: Aug 15 2007, 10:02 PM


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Chavez Proposes Changes to Constitution
Wednesday, August 15, 2007
(Posted Image)

By CHRISTOPHER TOOTHAKER, Associated Press Writer

E-MAIL STORY PRINTER FRIENDLY VERSION
CARACAS, Venezuela — President Hugo Chavez called for changes to Venezuela's constitution Wednesday night, delivering a key address pitching reforms that are expected to allow him to be re-elected indefinitely.

Chavez, speaking to the National Assembly, said the changes affect "less than 10 percent" of the constitution but would bring Venezuela "new horizons for the new era." Chavez, who is seeking to transform Venezuelan society along socialist lines, denied he wants lifelong power as his opponents allege.

"They accuse me of making plans to be in power forever or to concentrate power. We know it isn't like that. It's power of the people," Chavez said. "So many lies in the world. I doubt there is any country on this planet with a democracy more alive than the one we enjoy in Venezuela today."

Critics accuse Chavez of seeking to remain as president for decades to come, like his close friend Fidel Castro in Cuba. They argue his main goal is to expand his power and ensure he will be able to run again in 2012.

Chavez's political allies firmly control the National Assembly, which is expected to approve the reform plan within months. The plan then would have to be approved by citizens in a national referendum.

Chavez has previously stressed the need to do away with presidential term limits that currently prevent him from seeking re-election in 2012. But he began his speech discussing what he called a transition to "a new society" and other reforms, including territorial changes.

"There are 33 articles that starting tomorrow will begin to be read, analyzed, criticized," Chavez said, adding that with the speech "a great debate" begins. He made clear who he expects to oppose him, saying: "We can defeat the forces of (U.S.) imperialism and the servile oligarchy."

Before lawmakers, Chavez held up a small copy of the country's current constitution, dating to his first term in 1999, and called it one of the world's "most advanced" but said he and members of a presidential commission have been "working intensely" on ways to improve it.

Chavez waved to a crowd of cheering supporters as he walked into the legislature with fireworks exploding overhead. His opponents, meanwhile, attacked the reform plan.

"Chavez is seeking to reduce the territory held by the opposition and give his intention to remain in power a legal foundation," said Gerardo Blyde, an opposition leader and former lawmaker.

He said many other reforms are likely to be "red capes" like those used by a bullfighter "to distract Venezuelans from his real objective."

Venezuela's Roman Catholic Bishops' Conference has also complained that Chavez's reform proposals were drafted without public involvement.

Chavez, a former paratrooper commander who was first elected in 1998, denies copying Cuba and insists that personal freedoms will be respected. He and his supporters say democracy has flourished under his administration, noting he has repeatedly won elections by wide margins.

In Washington, State Department spokesman Sean McCormack said Wednesday that the United States would wait for details of Chavez's proposal before commenting on it. He added that Chavez in the past "has taken a number of different steps ... that have really eroded some of the underpinnings of democracy in Venezuela."

Since his re-election to a new six-year term in December, Chavez has alarmed opponents who claim that he is headed toward Cuba-style communism.

Chavez, a former paratrooper commander who was first elected in 1998, denies copying Cuba and insists that personal freedoms will be respected. He and his supporters say democracy has flourished under his administration, noting he has repeatedly won elections by wide margins.

Chavez pushed through a new constitution in 1999, shortly after he was first elected. He said the charter must be redrafted so that Venezuela's capitalist system "finishes dying" to make way for socialism.

Ahead of Chavez's speech, actors sang in the National Assembly as they performed a scene from the life of South American independence hero Simon Bolivar, the spiritual father of the socialist movement that Chavez calls the Bolivarian Revolution.

Crowds of red-clad supporters cheered outside the National Assembly, holding flags and signs reading: "Yes to the reform, on the path to 21st Century Socialism." Giant video screens were set up, and folk music blared from sound trucks near a two-story-tall inflatable figure of Chavez.

Hours earlier, U.S. State Department spokesman Sean McCormack said in Washington that the United States would wait for details of Chavez's proposal before commenting on it. He added that Chavez in the past "has taken a number of different steps ... that have really eroded some of the underpinnings of democracy in Venezuela."
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alive and still talking
Posted: Aug 16 2007, 08:43 PM


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.THE BIRTH OF A PROBLEM
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Hugo Chavez Frias was born in Sabaneta, Barinas State on July 28th, 1954. He has a mulatto background which gives him a common link to the 67% majority of Venezuelans. After he finished high school, he would have to travel to Caracas to continue his education. Chavez attended Venezuela’s Military Academy, where he graduated with a degree in Military Sciences and Arts on July 5, 1975. Having both parents as teachers its easy to see why he is an intellectual person, and why they weren't wealthy. Apparently his family also sold bananas and sowed corn for income. Chavez’ love for baseball is also easy to see. When he was a kid he played baseball like all children in Venezuela, and apparently he was a good pitcher. It was the desire to become a major league pitcher that initially led him into the military. After gaining his degree and his hopes of being a major leaguer gone, he continued on with his military career. During that time, he had various assignments, an armored unit, anti-guerilla duty along the Colombian border, and then as a military ethics instructor. Soon after that he began sowing the seeds for a coup in 1992.

In 1982 he founded the Bolivarian Revolutionary Movement. Through 1989-1990, he studied Political Science at Simon Bolivar University in Caracas. “He led an unsuccessful military coup against President Carlos Andres Perez on February 4th, 1992, that launched him onto the political scene and, at the same time, earned him two short years in what he refers to as the ‘prison of dignity’" (gosouthamerica.about.com). In a display of support, “While Chavez was in prison, he videotaped a call for insurrection that was broadcasted at around four in the morning on November 27th, 1992, when a second unsuccessful coup d’etat was attempted” (gosouthamerica.about.com). Two years later, he was pardoned by President Caldera.

Once Chavez was released from his conviction, he started to organize a political party called the Fifth Republic Movement (MVR), which would lead him to power four years later. “In November, 1998, a coalition of small leftist parties led by the MVR and under the umbrella of the Patriotic Pole won 34% of the seats in the National Congress and presented Chavez as its presidential candidate. After campaigning as ‘the scourge of the oligarchy and the champion of the poor’, Chavez came out victorious from the 1998 Presidential Elections with 56% of the votes­the largest majority in four decades (gosouthamerica.about.com).

Chavez’ speeches and actions are extreme to the right wing political parties of Venezuela and the United States, causing skepticism about his policies. The following description of Chavez is not how most politicians would like to be viewed, "A populist leader backed by leftist parties, Chavez has advocated a ‘third way’ between communism and capitalism", wrote Patrick Moser for the Agence France Presse. Since being elected, Chavez’ stile and personality have been very apparent. He has even managed to extend his love for baseball into politics. Chavez and Fedel Castro have played two baseball games, one when Chavez went to Cuba, another when Castro came to Caracas, with Cuba winning both games. Chavez pitched in both games for a few innings, while Castro, when he was in Venezuela took a turn at the plate. “To accelerate cooperation in Latin America, he visited Cuba, which has an antagonistic relationship with the United States, and he has a cordial personal relationship with Fidel Castro” (bjreview.com). Chavez’ relationship with Castro has been discouraged by the U.S. Chavez was also the first dignitary in ten years to visit Saddam Hussein in Iraq. These are the types of policies that have made him stand out.

Chavez is very much a peoples man; he has a weekly radio show that is called “Hello President”, and television show dubbed “Face to Face with the President, as well as a paper. Through each one he talks to the people, giving his opinions and the agenda for the Government, he also takes phone calls during the radio show to hear peoples problems and responds to letters. “Chavez also likes to spice his often lengthy and unusual speeches with quotes from the Bible, French poets, military overtones and repeated references to Simon Bolivar” (www.bjreview.com). Chavez also displays a very hands on approach to his presidency. On several occasions he has been out in the poor communities giving land deeds to people for newly allotted land, inspecting the work of the military, and talking to the common men and women of Venezuela. In his personal life he is married and has five children. His wife works as a public official also; she was elected in 2000. He also enjoys going home, where his father is currently the mayor of the town.
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castrix the defiant
Posted: Aug 17 2007, 09:22 AM


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The realy sad thing about this is that the people of Venezuela are walking into a dictatorship, with the opposition being silenced.

When chavez removes the legislation that caps presidential terms, it will be next to impossible for the people to elect a new leader.

Whats even worse is that when chavez officialy becomes a dictator, the oil vultures will take america to war for Venezuela's oil under the pretence of helping restore democracy and regime change.

going to war to restore democracy and change the current regime, sound familier?

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alive and still talking
Posted: Aug 17 2007, 10:34 AM


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they were in one the day he took power, look what happened to us?
CHAVEZ GETS HIS POWER FROM PUTIN, HIS NEW ALLY
My Webpage
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André
Posted: Aug 18 2007, 11:33 PM


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The birth of a problem for whom ?

Because it signals the death of an empire that relied only on brute force and bullying to keep and expand it's control. What we have here, is emerging nations who create alliances based on mutual interests, much like Russia is now doing today, should we be surprised that apparently it is working so well ?

Yes it's sad that they have to divert so much money and effort for security, but let's not be naive, we know what happened in the past, when they did not do so...
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alive and still talking
Posted: Aug 22 2007, 02:17 AM


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Argentina Cries Foul Against Chavez
(Posted Image)
Tuesday, Aug. 21, 2007 By UKI GONI/BUENOS AIRES
chavez kirchner
Venezuela's President Hugo Chavez talks to Argentina's President Nestor Kirchner during a meeting at the government house in Buenos Aires, Monday, Aug. 6, 2007.
Natacha Pisarenko / AP
Nestor and Cristina Kirchner, President and First Lady-Senator of Argentina, should love Venezuela's Hugo Chavez unequivocally. After all, Chavez is using Venezuela's petroleum riches to shore up Argentina's struggling economy, buying $1 billion of the country's bonds and investing $400 million in a natural gas plant to bolster Buenos Aires' energy needs. Indeed, there used to be a lot of mutual affection among the Latin American leaders, fellow leftists all. Last March, the couple played host to Chavez, and allowed him to use his visit to stage a rally against the U.S. and President Bush — who in Chavez-speak is both "a political cadaver" and "an imperialist knight." But the Kirchners are not too happy about one recent inflow of Venezuelan money into Argentina — especially if it jeopardizes Mrs. Kirchner's still-formidable advantage in the race to succeed her husband in October.
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The trouble started on Aug. 4 when Venezuelan-American businessman Guido Alejandro Antonini Wilson's luggage inadvertently went through standard scanning procedures, instead of being exempt from such an examination because he was a VIP returning from Caracas on a flight chartered by Argentina's state oil company. As a result of the scan, customs officials at Buenos Aires' Newberry airport found a bag stuffed with $790,550 in unmarked $50 bills. The other passengers on the plane were seven Argentine and Venezuelan oil officials who had been in Caracas negotiating the bond and gas plant deals.

Opponents and critics of the Argentine first couple immediately pounced on the incident as proof that Chavez was buying the support of the Kirchner government. "This is the proof of the corruption of this government," said Elisa Carrio, the main opposition candidate in the presidential campaign. The unseemliness of the airport discovery was not mitigated by Antonini Wilson's immediate flight from Argentina, apparently for Key Biscayne, Florida, where he maintains an apartment. A warrant has now been issued for his arrest by an Argentine court.

Chavez denies any link to the suitcase and dismisses the whole affair as a U.S. plot. "It is an absolute falsehood that the $800,000 had anything to do with functionaries of our government," Chavez told reporters in Buenos Aires when he visited two weeks ago, just after the affair came to light. For its part the Venezuelan state oil company — which has a branch in Argentina — denied any connection between itself and Antonini Wilson. However, news reports in Argentina and neighboring Uruguay claimed that Antonini Wilson's hotel bills and other expenses in the Uruguayan capital of Montevideo — just across the river from Buenos Aires — had been paid for by the Venezuelan company.

Even before he arrived on his state visit, the Kirchners demanded that Chavez dismiss his state oil company's representatives in Argentina, which the Venezuelan president complied with only belatedly last Friday, Aug. 17. In more damage control, they got the resignation of Argentine road toll authority chief Claudio Uberti, a fellow passenger who allowed Antonini Wilson to board the plane.

Kirchner opponents wary of the Venezuelan President's cozy relations with Cuba and Iran have seized on an issue that may slow down what seemed to be Senator Kirchner's inevitable rise to the Presidency. The daily Clarin, Argentina's most widely read newspaper, carried an op-ed piece by one of its top editors, Ricardo Kirschbaum, calling the suitcase affair "one of the greatest misfortunes" in Mrs. Kirchner's campaign, stating that "Hugo Chavez is one of the core themes in the electoral campaign."

The affair has also brought into focus the issue of alleged corruption in the Kirchner administration. Only last month, economy minister Felisa Miceli was forced to resign after a bag containing cash totaling some $60,000 was discovered in her office bathroom. Her resignation followed other revelations regarding bribery and false billing in government contracts, as well as accustions that Kirchner's administration has been tampering with official inflation and unemployment figures to make both appear lower than they are in reality.

While Senator Kirchner is still the favorite to become the next President of Argentina, her government will have to live with this new legacy. "Mrs. Kirchner's administration will probably be facing more difficulties than could have been foreseen only a short time ago," says political analyst Rosendo Fraga. The suitcase affair may be more harmful to Argentina's relations with Chavez. "The case of the $800,000 has turned the relationship with Venezuela into a political problem," says Fraga. "Kirchner tried to convince Chavez to accept some of the political cost of the suitcase affair, but Chavez refused to take it." Chavez, Fraga explains, can refuse "because of Argentina's economic dependence on Venezuela." And the political sting of that dependence is the Kirchner's problem.

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André
Posted: Aug 22 2007, 12:09 PM


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You would think that somebody with $800k in cash would keep a very close eye on it since it would be very incriminating, duhh or they would transfer the money into a secret bank account and avoid any chances of being cought, double duhh, this is obviously a frame up, we are dealing with big stakes here...you can easily imagine who could be behind the scenes trying to smear these people... :ph43r:
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alive and still talking
Posted: Sep 5 2007, 03:55 AM


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news article from june 2007

Chavez Tells Venezuelan Soldiers to Prepare for War With U.S.
Monday, June 25, 2007
(Posted Image)
Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez
CARACAS, Venezuela — President Hugo Chavez urged soldiers on Sunday to prepare for a guerrilla-style war against the United States, saying that Washington is using psychological and economic warfare as part of an unconventional campaign aimed at derailing his government.

Dressed in olive green fatigues and a red beret, Chavez spoke inside Tiuna Fort — Venezuela's military nerve-center—before hundreds of uniformed soldiers standing alongside armored vehicles and tanks decorated with banners reading: "Fatherland, Socialism, or Death! We will triumph!"

"We must continue developing the resistance war, that's the anti- imperialist weapon. We must think and prepare for the resistance war everyday," said Chavez, who has repeatedly warned that American soldiers could invade Venezuela to seize control of the South American nation's immense oil reserves.

U.S. officials reject claims that Washington is considering a military attack. But the U.S. government has expressed concern over what it perceives as a significant arms build-up here.

Chavez—a close ally of Cuban leader Fidel Castro—told soldiers that Washington was trying to weaken and divide Venezuelan society, including the armed forces, without resorting to combat.

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seabhcan
Posted: Sep 5 2007, 07:50 AM


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Watch "The Revolution Will Not be Televised"

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=5832390545689805144

Removing term limits does not mean that Chavez is a dictator. He still needs to be re-elected at the end of his term. Personally, I don't like it, but most countries don't have term limits.

Venezuela is probably the most democratic country in the world at them moment - and as far from a dictatorship as i can imagine. If Chavez displeases the people at any point, he will be booted out. The people put him there, they can get him out.
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Alexjonesfan
Posted: Sep 7 2007, 05:29 PM


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I think we need to tend to our own garden. We made Hugo a hero when our insane neo-con oil bastards tried to assisinate the guy for not taking the economic hit-man deal.

The audacity of other countries wanting to keep their resources.

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sethp
Posted: Sep 18 2007, 06:42 AM


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yea these term limits are a little bit of good and bad tony blair (uk) and john howard (aus) helen clark (nz) and these are just the countries i know of, they have all had over 2 terms
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alive and still talking
Posted: Sep 18 2007, 11:48 AM


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chavez is now poised and ready to play peacemaker in rescuing columbian govt officials held by insurgents as hostages, he wants to appear as a hero not only to his people but columbian citizens. cnn just announced
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seabhcan
Posted: Sep 19 2007, 03:50 AM


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QUOTE (alive and still talking @ Sep 18 2007, 04:48 PM)
chavez is now poised and ready to play peacemaker in rescuing columbian govt officials held by insurgents as hostages, he wants to appear as a hero not only to his people but columbian citizens. cnn just announced

If he solves the colombian thing he'll be a hero with me too.
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castrix the defiant
Posted: Sep 20 2007, 07:42 AM


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left wing governments have a history of supplying left wing gorillas, how do we know that chaves isn't actually helping the gorillas, while at the same time using this deal to free the hostages, all for his own advantage.
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seabhcan
Posted: Sep 20 2007, 09:15 AM


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QUOTE (castrix the defiant @ Sep 20 2007, 12:42 PM)
left wing governments have a history of supplying left wing gorillas, how do we know that chaves isn't actually helping the gorillas, while at the same time using this deal to free the hostages, all for his own advantage.

Right wing governments have a history of supplying right wing gorillas too.

The FARC were around decades before Chavez got power.
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alive and still talking
Posted: Sep 25 2007, 09:09 PM


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I don't think chavez would be so popular if he didnt have a ligitimate beef with right wing neocons here in the united states.

that is the very platform that sustains him. If we were friends with his neighboring countries, he would be less popular. that should develop once democrats take over the white house,
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Roxdog
Posted: Sep 26 2007, 05:06 PM


Why is Al Gore's House Bigger Than Everyone Else's?


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Do you have a point, alive and still blabbering?
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Arbor
Posted: Sep 26 2007, 08:44 PM


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Term limits are the only thing a nation has to prevent dictatorship. Just imagine if Nazi Germany had term limits?
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Roxdog
Posted: Sep 27 2007, 05:50 PM


Why is Al Gore's House Bigger Than Everyone Else's?


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QUOTE (Arbor @ Sep 27 2007, 01:44 AM)
Term limits are the only thing a nation has to prevent dictatorship. Just imagine if Nazi Germany had term limits?

Well, not the only thing. The right to bear arms has a lot to do with it. Historically, nations whose citizens can own firearms don't get invaded or become dictatorships. Notice that gun bans start to come about when a dictatorship is being erected. Russia, China, Germany, etc....
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alive and still talking
Posted: Dec 1 2007, 01:11 PM


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TALK TO THE HAND

My Webpage

Chavez is dealing with a new public attitude since the KING OF SPAIN told him to shut up.
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