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 Kissinger Threatens Putin W Nukes, at interesting meeting
George Hayduke
Posted: Jul 13 2007, 05:25 PM


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From the wire:

QUOTE
NOVO-OGARYOVO, Russia (AP) - President Vladimir Putin said Friday that U.S.-Russia relations must rise above shifting political trends, as influential top diplomats, ministers and Cabinet secretaries conferred on the two countries' uneasy relationship.

With ties between Washington and Moscow fraying, Putin met with top level U.S. and Russian diplomats, former government ministers and Cabinet secretaries at the presidential country house on Moscow's outskirts.

Putin told the group that bilateral ties should not be held hostage to election campaigns. Both the United States and Russia hold presidential elections next year.

"We can't afford to let the U.S.-Russian relationship be subservient to political fashion," Putin told the group.

"I hope very much that the results of your discussions will not find their resting place in the archives of the foreign ministers, but will be used," he said.

Former U.S. secretaries of state Henry Kissinger and George Schultz and former Treasury Secretary Robert Rubin joined former Prime Minister Yevgeny Primakov and other Russian officials at the conference, called "Russia-USA _ A View On The Future."

Ties between the two countries deteriorated recently, as Moscow reacted harshly to U.S. plans for a missile defense system in former Soviet bloc countries in Eastern Europe.

Washington says the system will protect Europe from an Iranian nuclear missile attack. Russia says the U.S. system is aimed at its nuclear arsenal, and would upset the balance of strategic forces in Europe.

Kissinger, meanwhile, said the officials had a "frank, cordial discussion on a whole number of important issues for both societies and the rest of the world as well."

"We appreciate the time that President Putin gave us and the frank manner in which he explained his point of view," he said.

Told by a reporter that Russians are concerned about "U.S. military expansion," Kissinger responded: "I do not think that expansion is a problem of the period. The problem of the period is how to avoid nuclear conflict and in this case we believe that Russia and America should have common objectives."

Also Friday, Putin met with Chinese Foreign Minister Yang Jiechi. Russia and China stressed their common desire for a "multi-polar world" _ one not dominated by the United States _ and vowed to keep improving economic ties.


Relations "have reached an especially high level," Putin said, adding the volume of bilateral trade was increasing by up to 43 percent annually.

Communist rivals through much of the Soviet era, Russia and China have found common ground in their opposition to what they call U.S. dominance of world affairs. They have used their clout as veto-wielding permanent U.N. Security Council members to counter U.S. moves, for example, forcing proposed sanctions against Iran to be watered down.

With Russia's population declining, residents of its sparsely populated eastern regions are concerned about the expanding presence of Chinese migrants.


Looks like we're looking at a Russia-China alignment and that Kissinger basically went over there and threatened them with nukes.

Nukes are all we've got. We're overextended militarily in Iraq. China has a burgeoning army as does Russia; neither have their gear tied up fighting a losing war against a guerilla insurgency; Russia is now the world's foremost exporter of petrochemicals and thus both Russia and China could likely handle an economic war; and word in the underground is that the Russian military is technologically superior to ours by a decade.

Make no mistake, these men today were negotiating global nuclear war.
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buddy
Posted: Jul 13 2007, 05:26 PM


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:blink:
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jimmyb207
Posted: Jul 13 2007, 08:48 PM


WTF?


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QUOTE (George Hayduke @ Jul 13 2007, 05:25 PM)

Make no mistake, these men today were negotiating global nuclear war.

George, it seems throughout history, where ever Kissinger goes....blood and destruction is sure to follow. President Bush nominated Kissinger as chairman of the September 11 investigating commission. It's like picking a bank robber to investigate a fraud scandal.
Knowing he has ANYTHING to say about nuclear weapons is friggin scary...to say the least of it. :huh:

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seeker135
Posted: Jul 13 2007, 09:27 PM


Death to Tyrants


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I hope they bury that pig somewhere on the eastern seaboard so I can p*ss on his grave in honor and memory of the thousand of boys he killed in 'Nam. :angry:
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RollingSphere
Posted: Jul 13 2007, 09:39 PM


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QUOTE (seeker135 @ Jul 14 2007, 02:27 AM)
I hope they bury that pig somewhere on the eastern seaboard so I can p*ss on his grave in honor and memory of the thousand of boys he killed in 'Nam. :angry:

agreed, that man is evil.
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seeker135
Posted: Jul 13 2007, 09:43 PM


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Actually, my earlier post is an insult to real pigs everywhere. Words fail when trying to describe K the Killer.
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jimmyb207
Posted: Jul 13 2007, 09:47 PM


WTF?


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QUOTE (seeker135 @ Jul 13 2007, 09:27 PM)
I hope they bury that pig somewhere on the eastern seaboard so I can p*ss on his grave in honor and memory of the thousand of boys he killed in 'Nam. :angry:

Here is an excerpt from The National Security Archive website, Just to let you know that Kissinger is a nuclear holocaust waiting to happen:

QUOTE
Roger Morris, a member of the September Group, later reported that he had been shown plans that targeted at least two sites in North Vietnam for nuclear air bursts. Special Counsel to the President Charles Colson--who was not a member of the contingency group but who asked Nixon's chief of staff H. R. Haldeman in 1970 about contingency planning in 1969--claimed that Haldeman said "Kissinger had lobbied for nuclear options in the spring and fall of 1969." One Kissinger aide, Winston Lord, expressed incredulity to one of the present writers: "It's beyond my comprehension that they would even think of doing that." But he allowed for the possibility that the Vietnamese might worry about nuclear weapons and that, consistent with Nixon's "madman theory . . , we wouldn't go out of our way to allay their fears about that." (Note 5)

http://www.gwu.edu/~nsarchiv/NSAEBB/NSAEBB195/index.htm

THATS why this news is serious shit.....
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seeker135
Posted: Jul 13 2007, 10:34 PM


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We knew about him then. No surprise now. :angry:
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George Hayduke
Posted: Jul 14 2007, 05:12 AM


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QUOTE (jimmyb207 @ Jul 14 2007, 01:48 AM)
QUOTE (George Hayduke @ Jul 13 2007, 05:25 PM)

Make no mistake, these men today were negotiating global nuclear war.

George, it seems throughout history, where ever Kissinger goes....blood and destruction is sure to follow. President Bush nominated Kissinger as chairman of the September 11 investigating commission. It's like picking a bank robber to investigate a fraud scandal.
Knowing he has ANYTHING to say about nuclear weapons is friggin scary...to say the least of it. :huh:

Did you get the impression from the article that Putin was basically telling Kissinger "don't take it personally but you're going down?"

It really makes me wonder if Russia isn't thwarting some sort of staged event that the hawks here desire and that was part of the purpose of this meeting.
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George Hayduke
Posted: Jul 14 2007, 10:16 AM


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Now Russia is backing out of a treaty governing the militarization of Europe.

QUOTE
MOSCOW (AP) - Russia on Saturday suspended its participation in a key European arms control treaty that governs deployment of troops on the continent, the Kremlin said, a move that threatened to further aggravate Moscow's already tense relations with the West.

President Vladimir Putin signed a decree suspending Russia's participation in the Conventional Forces in Europe Treaty due to "extraordinary circumstances ... which affect the security of the Russian Federation and require immediate measures," the Kremlin said in a statement.

Putin has in the past threatened to freeze his country's compliance with the treaty, accusing the United States and its NATO partners of undermining regional stability with U.S. plans for a missile defense system in former Soviet bloc countries in Eastern Europe.

Under the moratorium, Russia will halt inspections and verifications of its military sites by NATO countries and will no longer limit the number of its conventional weapons, the Foreign Ministry said in a statement.

The White House reacted with disappointment to Russia's decision.

"We're disappointed Russia has suspended its participation for now, but we'll continue to have discussions with them in the coming months on the best way to proceed in this area _ that is in the interest of all parties involved and provides for security in Europe," Gordon Johndroe, a spokeman for the National Security Council, said in a statement.

In Brussels, NATO spokesman James Appathurai condemned the decision. "NATO regrets this decision by the Russian Federation. It is a step in the wrong direction," Appathurai said.

The treaty, between Russian and NATO members, was signed in 1990 and amended in 1999 to reflect changes since the breakup of the Soviet Union, adding the requirement that Moscow withdraw troops from the former Soviet republics of Moldova and Georgia.

Russia has ratified the amended version, but the United States and other NATO members have refused to do so until Russia completely withdraws.

Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov said Russia could no longer tolerate a situation where it was complying with the treaty but its partners were not, and he expressed hope that Russia's move would induce Western nations to commit to the updated treaty.

"Such a situation contradicts Russia's interests," Peskov told The Associated Press. "Russia continues to expect that other nations that have signed the CFE will fulfill their obligations."

The treaty is seen as a key element in maintaining stability in Europe. It establishes limitations on countries' deployment of tanks, armored combat vehicles, artillery, attack helicopters and combat aircraft.

Withdrawal from the Conventional Forces in Europe Treaty would allow Moscow to build up forces near its borders.

But Russian military analysts have said the possibility of suspending participation in the treaty was a symbolic rising of ante in the missile shield showdown more than a sign of impending military escalation.

Pavel Felgenhauer, a Moscow-based defense analyst, said the moratorium probably won't result in any major buildup of heavy weaponry in European Russia. Russia has no actual interest in the highly costly build up of forces because it faces no real military threat and has no plans to launch an attack of its won, he said.

But, he said, it could mean an end to onsite inspections and verifications by NATO countries, which many European nations rely on to keep track of Russian deployments.

For the United States, the moratorium will mostly be a symbolic gesture, he said, since the U.S. has an extensive intelligence network that keeps close track of Russian forces. But it will still be seen as another unfriendly move in Washington, Felgenhauer predicted.

"This will be a major irritant," he said. "It will seriously spoil relations. The kind of soothing effect from the last summit with Putin and (President) Bush will evaporate swiftly," he said referring a summit between the leaders earlier this month at the Bush family home in Kennebunkport, Maine.

Felgenhauer also said that there is no provision under the treaty for a moratorium, suggesting Russia was acting illegally. "This is basically non-compliance, and this is an illegal move," he said.


But don't worry, the AP says. It's only a symbolic move.
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