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 Genesis - Mitosis, Cellular Stage - Update Archive
OathinBlood
Posted: Apr 14 2007, 08:22 PM


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Paramecium neovita - 'New Life'
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Only a few million years had past since the planet's devastating encounter with a comet, totally obliterating most life on the surface. But, as with all things in nature, life began anew from the few remaining organisms that had survived the catastrophe. What was once barren expanses of desert had once again begun to return to the site of flora and fauna that once had inhabited every nook and cranny. Even so, however, the species were still few and far between.

Most races that had survived however had been microscopic, but the comet had left large traces of sulphur everywhere due to frequent eruptions as the planet revolted against the destruction of all it’s ecosystems, which had meticulously evolved and developed over the course of millennia. Just enough sulphur collected everywhere to stunt the evolutionary process in all living matter - evolution was at a standstill. However, as the aeons progressed, the sulphuric levels in many areas, especially that saturating the water, ever so slowly began to diminish. And as the sulphur levels reached near their original neutral zone, the miracle of evolution began once more.

One of these organisms to start anew happened to be a group of single-celled protists that had survived the disaster, as many other races had, by learning to adapt to allow their sulphuric tolerance to peak. Now, however, the protists were faced with a choice. The smog clouding the sun has opened up more recently, allowing for more light. The diatoms clouding the environment had yet to increase or decrease in population, but the large and predatory amoebas had shown a slight increase. The largest organisms in the environment were massive multicellular flatworms, though sightings of them had been rare. As a carnivore, the diatoms would provide ample food, but the sunlight would also make photosynthesis a viable choice.

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What kind of cell are you?
A) A flagellate, protists with a long, whip-like flagella used to move. (Speed ++, Control +)
B) An amoeboid, protists that move and feed with pseudopods. (Attack ++, Defence +)
C) A faster, movement-oriented ciliate, protists with hair-like organelles called cilia that help them move. (Control ++, Speed +)
D) A slower, predator-oriented ciliate, protists with hair-like organelles called cilia that help them move. (Attack +, Speed +, Control +)
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OathinBlood
Posted: Apr 14 2007, 08:24 PM


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Paramecium abeovita – ‘Changed Life’
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Within only relatively few generations, our protists had already grown into a slow, predator-oriented ciliate. This had proven to be a decent choice for our protists, and now they could actually have a fighting chance, however desperately small, against the amoebas, instead of just being hopelessly devoured by them. Along with this, the diatoms were rich in population and were virtually defenceless, leading to an slight increase in their overall population. However, this had done nothing in the way of quelling our protist's predators, and now the protists could only watch on as the amoebas and worms descended upon them with ravenous ferocity.

Not much had changed locally in the last several generations - the sunlight that reached the area had remained relatively the same, which had lead to a noticeable increase in the population of the diatoms. This had been kept in check by both our protists and the amoebas, which had been readily feeding on them now due to their population boom. This feeding frenzy of the amoebas had also lead to a population increase, which was both dangerous to the diatoms as well as our protists. The worms had also increased, but at so minuscule a number, it was barely noticeable and had not yet become a problem. Then one day, just when it looked like our protist population would never grow any larger, it happened again - a genetic mutation in a few individuals, allowing the species new hope as it struggled to survive in this harsh oceanic environment.

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What do you want to evolve?
A) A flagella, a long, whip-like tail. (Speed ++, Control +)
B) Finer cilia, hair-like organelles which are used to move. (Control ++, Speed +)
C) A pseudopod, a blob-like projection which can be used to move and feed. (Attack +, Speed +, Control +)
D) A horn-like projection, used to penetrate through other cell membranes. (Attack ++, Defence +)
E) A pair of cnidocytes, barbed and poisonous spikes which shoot out to stun other creatures. (Attack +++)
F) A pair of eye-like sensory organs, allowing basic sight. (Sight +++)
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OathinBlood
Posted: Apr 14 2007, 08:25 PM


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Cnidomecium spiculoses – ‘Stinging Body’
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With the Protist's newest evolutionary leap of faith, they had gained a pair of toxin-laced cnidocytes which allowed them to fight their enemies and impale their prey, the amoebas and diatoms. With this new adaptation, they were capable of piercing the amoeboids’ cell membrane, allowing its inner cytoplasm to spill forth for our protists to feast upon - however, this adaptation was far from perfect. Still only possessing their simple cilia as movement, the cnidocytes were used more often too add injury to insult than actually be a fatal surprise – that is to say, they were more often used when the prey was already in their grasp instead of them being the opening attack. However, our protists, who now had the ability to fend off some amoeba attacks, had prospered and increased in small amounts.

Times had been a tad bit more relaxed - the adaptation had allowed our protists to fend off their main predator mostly, although they still really lacked the speed required to turn the tables on them quite yet. Diatom population had remained steady despite the frenzied attitudes of both the amoebas and protists against them. The amoeba numbers had stayed about the same as well, due to the somewhat ineffectiveness of our protist's adaptation, but at the least, quite fewer protists have been consumed by the amoebas. However, dark horizons would be arising soon, as the worm population had gone unheeded, and their numbers had continued to gradually rise. Luckily, fate granted our protists yet another genetic mutation, and they once more got the chance to adapt to the inevitable changes to take place.

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What do you want to evolve?
A) A flagella, a long, whip-like tail. (Speed ++, Control +)
B) Enlarge our size, to increase cellular mass and grow in size and strength. (Defence ++, Attack ++, Speed -)
C) A pseudopod, a blob-like projection which can be used to move and feed. (Attack +, Speed +, Control +)
D) A simple jet, to take advantage of the surrounding water to deliver a short burst of speed. (Speed +++)
E) Develop the ability to photosynthesize, using the sunlight in addition to preying on smaller creatures for nutrients. (The ability to survive without other creatures to feed on.)
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OathinBlood
Posted: Apr 14 2007, 08:26 PM


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Cnidomecium penisvenator – ‘Tailed Hunter’
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Our protists soon began to evolve a flagella, providing them the speed needed to start using their cnidocytes offensively, instead of defensively. This had made them a fearsome foe in the ocular organelles of the amoebas, although our protists already dominated the diatoms. However, times had changed, and our protists’ head start seemed to be over. Both the diatoms and the amoebas had also experienced mutations, which had better allowed them to fend off their predators - including our protists. The diatoms had grown a single wriggling flagellum, allowing them to propel themselves at decent speeds through the water rather than being forced to move with the tide. Because of this, they moved slightly faster than our protists, being smaller and lighter; however, they still lacked sight, a weakness that we could not exploit do to our own blindness. The amoeboids on the other hand, had taken a different course of action - they had grown in size, going from three times larger to us to four times larger, thereby increasing their threat level to our protists. They were still susceptible to our cnidocytes, whose narrow tips could easily penetrate their cell membrane, and were larger, making them easier to hit. However, they were now able to eat us in larger numbers, slowing our population growth quite a bit.

The sunlight had remained constant over many millennia, allowing the diatom population to boom dramatically, due also in part to their new adaptations. The amoebas were also doing fairly well, and had become more of a threat to us as we were to them. There were now two types of worms seen – the flatworms, rarely seen predators which used a vacuum-like mouth to inhale all protists within reach, and the round-worms, smaller and more commonly spotted worms which only preyed on the larger protists, like the amoebas. The roundworms had been seen in steadily increasing numbers, preying voraciously on the amoebas. After many more generations, fate once again smiled upon the tiny beings, and allowed yet another wonderful and glorious mutation.

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What do you want to evolve?
A) Finer cilia, hair-like organelles which are used to move. (Control ++, Speed +)
B) Enlarge our size, to increase cellular mass and grow in size and strength. (Defence ++, Attack ++, Speed -)
C) A meta-skeleton, a cellular exoskeleton to help defend against attacks. (Defence +++)
D) Specially adapted cilia that are flattened on the end, used like paddles to provide ultimate control of our direction. (Control +++)
E) Develop the ability to photosynthesize, using the sunlight in addition to preying on smaller creatures for nutrients. (The ability to survive without other creatures.)
F) A horn-like protrusion, used to penetrate through other cell membranes. (Attack ++, Defence +)
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OathinBlood
Posted: Apr 14 2007, 08:58 PM


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Cnidomecium punctumieiunium – ‘Swift Stinger’
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Although our protists had been experiencing only an occasionally interrupted diet due to their food sources adapting, genetics played them another interesting hand - over a hundred generations or so, their cilia elongated and doubled in number, allowing them to cruise the waters with speed and control unmatched by any other creature in the environment, save some of the faster worms. We could outswim the diatoms easily, catching up with them only to impale and engulf them. The amoebas couldn’t keep up with us, and their involvement in our short lives lessened and lessened. Losing a major food source, us, their population lost several thousand, which seemed to be added into our ranks as we multiplied and multiplied. However, sometimes we would swim past large groups of diatoms, or into the gaping oral grooves of amoebas, due to our complete lack of any sensory organelles.

With the sunlight's trustworthy schedule of appearance, the diatom populations had also boomed. The worms, both round and flat, were a common sight now, and were often seen picking off amoebas and moving on their way. Luckily, they had yet to spot our protists due to our small size, although our general safety was possibly at risk. If those roundworms happened to eat things smaller than the amoebas, we’d be in a very tough spot. But since we had yet to be seen, there was a possibility of relative safety around them. They could helped us by fighting the gargantuan amoebas, but now with our cilia and flagella, we could do without their protection. Still, we couldn’t outswim them, so if we were spotted…

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What do you want to evolve?
A) Enlarge our size, to increase cellular mass and grow in size and strength. (Defence ++, Attack ++, Speed -)
B) Specially adapted sensory cilia near the front of the cell, used to sense vibrations in the water like cellular whiskers. (Touch +++)
C) A meta-skeleton, a cellular exoskeleton to help defend against attacks. (Defence +++)
D) Specially adapted cilia that are flattened on the end, used like paddles to provide ultimate control of our direction. (Control +++)
E) A pair of eye-like sensory organs, allowing basic sight. (Sight +++)
F) A horn-like protrusion, used to penetrate through other cell membranes. (Attack ++, Defence +)
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OathinBlood
Posted: Apr 15 2007, 02:50 PM


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Cnidomecium bidiplobarba – ‘Two Pairs of Barbs’
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It only took about twenty-five generations for our protists to once again mutate, this time growing a pair of stiff bristle-like cilia protruding out of the front of their bodies, flanking the toxin-laced cnidocytes. This new adaptation allowed our protist to sense both prey and predator, and we could now take advantage of the diatoms’ blindness, swimming into their paths and engulfing them within our oral groove. However, life was far from easier for our protists, as both diatoms and amoebas had both evolved again. The diatoms had gained a meta-skeleton to protect themselves, but it was thinner than normal due to the requirement for it to be thin enough to let light in, so photosynthesis could take place. Regardless of meta-skeleton or not, our cnidocytes, with the momentum gained by our cilia and flagella, could still easily pierce the thin shells. The amoebas had evolved a pair of ocular organelles, allowing them to have basic sight, and could now locate the protists much easier than before – though they were still not fast enough to predate on us, nor could they take advantage of our lack of senses anymore. Both evolved diatoms and amoebas did little to combat our sting and speed, though nature would not let us go so easily. The roundworms had grown sharper senses, and could now locate us. Sporting massive jaws and keen senses, the creatures, like freight-trains compared to us, predated heavily on us, only being driven off when stung by multiple cnidocytes. Even them, another worm would come in to eat our protists before their cnidocytes had regenerated. Due to their size and capability for slaughter, these worms were dubbed Leviathan Worms.

Due to the sudden attacks by the Leviathan Worms, the diatom, amoeba, and protist populations had suffered dramatically. Our protists had barely been able to keep up with the massacres, and their numbers had been reduced by almost a third. The species had spent much of its time trying to hide rather than hunt, and starvation was common, due to an inability to get energy from anywhere else. The diatoms did the same, using their photosynthesis to make their own food, but the amoebas have not been so lucky, due to their large size. Their appearance was less common, and they were in danger of extinction. The only other difference in the ecosystem was the increasing rarity of roundworms, which were now very rarely spotted, if at all.

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What do you want to evolve?
A) Enlarge our size, to increase cellular mass and grow in size and strength. (Defence ++, Attack ++, Speed -)
B) Specially elongated and flexible cilia near the front of the cell, used to latch onto prey and sense vibrations in the water, like miniature tentacles. (Attack ++, Touch +)
C) A thicker cytoskeleton, to protect organelles inside the body of the cell. (Defence +++)
D) Specially adapted cilia that are flattened on the end, used like paddles to provide ultimate control of our direction. (Control +++)
E) Bad-tasting cytoplasm, choosing to ingest several mildly poisonous chemicals in the water to make our cytoplasm taste bad to predators. (Defence +++)
F) A simple jet, to take advantage of the surrounding water to deliver a short burst of speed. (Speed +++)
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OathinBlood
Posted: Apr 16 2007, 07:10 PM


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Cnidomecium tentaclotops – ‘Tentacled Face’
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Over the course of thousands of years, while struggling for survival in our precious gallons of water, the ocean had slowly shifted us, and we were now in rocky tidal pools, devoid of any major life. Our entire cellular ecosystem had shifted with us however, and not much had changed.

The Leviathan Worms had not stopped their feeding-time massacres, and all the protist populations had suffered significant losses. However, as time continued to wane on, the three various protists began to adapt to these voracious fiends. Our protists adapted their cilia once again to grow a pair of long tentacles, which had miniscule barbs on them to grasp things more securely. Now, as the Leviathan Worms swept in to feed on us, the ones it passed could whip out their tentacles and ride on the worm’s skin, attacking it with their cnidocytes. Still, no matter how many of us, by the time our cnidocytes had regenerated, the worm we attacked had somehow regained it’s full vigor. We suffered less death, but still, we suffered a lot. On the other hand, the diatoms had evolved a tube at the back of their meta-skeleton, which they shot accumulated water out of, making a simple jet. When faced with the worms, the majority would wait until they were nearly swept up, then dart away quickly using their jet and flagella. This was an effective tactic, and their population didn’t drop as harshly this time. The amoebas, who were now cautious and little-seen, had grown a feathery-feeder mouth and had begun spending much of their time filtering nutrients out of the water, no longer the fierce predators they once were.

Although the population of our protists was severely reduced, it was not crippled, and they had adapted well enough to survive, at least for now. But with the diatoms being able to partially evade the worms, and the amoebas growing ever rarer, the Leviathan Worms greatest food source was now us. Their numbers had swollen, and now their species was spreading out, conquering new evolutionary territory. Tough times faced our protists, and without a major change, we would soon die out.

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What do you want to evolve?
A) Poison tolerance, to grow very slightly resistant to some poisons in the water. (The ability to resist some poisons.)
B) Develop the ability to photosynthesize, using the sunlight in addition to preying on smaller creatures for nutrients. (The ability to survive without other creatures.)
C) A thicker cytoskeleton, to protect organelles inside the body of the cell. (Defence +++)
D) Specially adapted mouth parts, to change the way we can feed.
----- I) A feathery filter-mouth, to filter nutrients and minute phytoplankton out of the water. (The ability to gain nutrients from phytoplankton in addition to larger prey.)
----- II) A circular, sharp-but-rough tooth-like mouth, to hang to and grind off flesh to eat. This is a very specialized mouth, and will only allow our protests to feed larger organisms, not including diatoms and amoebas. (Attack +++)
----- III) A series of flaps and sharp teeth-like protrusions, like an insect mouth on a cellular scale. (Attack +++)
----- IV) A sharp, needle-like proboscis to feed on body liquids. This is a very specialized mouth, and will only allow our protests to feed larger organisms, not including diatoms and amoebas. (Attack +++)
E) Bad-tasting cytoplasm, choosing to ingest several mildly poisonous chemicals in the water to make our cytoplasm taste bad to predators. (Defence +++)
F) A simple jet, to take advantage of the surrounding water to deliver a short burst of speed. (Speed +++)
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OathinBlood
Posted: Apr 17 2007, 07:06 PM


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Cnidomecium tentacloneustesieiunium – ‘Swift Tentacled Swimmer’
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During the next few million years, the massacres slowed, although they never stopped. This was due partially to the worms becoming less aggressive in general and attacking us less, but also because of our protists’ newest adaptation – a small and simple tube near the rear of their body, called a hyponome. While swimming, our protists would engulf a small amount of water through new pores that they had evolved, which could be expelled rapidly through the hyponome, giving the protist a short boost of speed. Although used far less than the cilia and flagella, this jet would often surprise the worms and could be used to suddenly dart away from the worm when it was already too late for it to turn around. Still, the Leviathan Worm’s population didn’t seem to drop – but neither did it grow – at least, not too much.

Due to the success of our protists’ most recent adaptation, and the Leviathan Worms loss of aggressiveness, their population had begun to grow once more. The amoebas were somewhat uncommon nowadays, but the diatoms, ever breeding, were still in large numbers, despite the efforts of the Leviathan Worms. Even so, the Leviathan Worms were still a great threat, and in order to survive long, adaptations had to continue.

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What do you want to evolve?
A) Poison tolerance, to grow very slightly resistant to some poisons in the water. (The ability to resist some poisons.)
B) Develop the ability to photosynthesize, using the sunlight in addition to preying on smaller creatures for nutrients. (The ability to survive without other creatures.)
C) A thicker cytoskeleton, to protect organelles inside the body of the cell. (Defence +++)
D) Specially adapted mouth parts, to change the way we can feed.
----- I) A feathery filter-mouth, to filter nutrients and minute phytoplankton out of the water. (The ability to gain nutrients from phytoplankton in addition to larger prey.)
----- II) A circular, sharp-but-rough tooth-like mouth, to hang to and grind off flesh to eat. This is a very specialized mouth, and will only allow our protests to feed larger organisms, not including diatoms and amoebas. (Attack +++)
----- III) A series of flaps and sharp teeth-like protrusions, like an insect mouth on a cellular scale. (Attack +++)
----- IV) A sharp, needle-like proboscis to feed on body liquids. This is a very specialized mouth, and will only allow our protests to feed larger organisms, not including diatoms and amoebas. (Attack +++)
E) Bad-tasting cytoplasm, choosing to ingest several mildly poisonous chemicals in the water to make our cytoplasm taste bad to predators. (Defence +++)
F) A horn-like protrusion, used to penetrate through other cell membranes. (Attack ++, Defence +)
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OathinBlood
Posted: Apr 22 2007, 01:06 AM


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Cnidomecium viridifolium – ‘Green Leaf’
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A small species of green algae drifted into our cellular tidal-pool ecosystem, washed in by the mighty waves just as we had been. Although initially our protists attempted consumption of this tiny race, this proved a very ineffective method of gaining energy, and usually used more energy than was gained, because they were hard to digest for our species due to their thick cell walls. Initially, it flourished in the area, much more than the diatoms, but due to their complete lack of any defensive adaptations other than their cell walls, and their absolute lack of mobile adaptations, they quickly dwindled in numbers as the amoebas found them, devouring them in massive numbers, though when they drifted into our masses, they were safe, since we had now ‘learned’ to avoid them. Realizing the value of our protection, the algae evolved gradually into symbiotes, up to the point where they lived in our cytoplasm, protected by our many defences. By becoming symbiotes, they could use the protection of our bodies, while in turn we fed off some of their glucose, which they obtained through photosynthesis. With this new symbiotic relationship, our protists gained a whole new ability in life - so long as we remained near the surface, we could go without outside energy for some time, but were now required to stay near the surface of the water in order to keep our symbiotes alive. Cnidomecium tentacloneustesieiunium steadily fell off the face of the map, replaced with a newer, far more efficient creature – Cnidomecium veridifolium.

With the sunlight's trustworthy schedule of appearance, and the newfound energy source, our protist population had boomed to almost twice its size. The diatom and amoeba populations had also boomed, as our protists spent a good percentage of their time now staying at the surface. The Leviathan Worms were almost commonsight now, and were often seen picking off Amoebas and moving on their way. It seemed they had found an alternate food source, for although they swam among us, we seemed to be eaten as snacks or appetizers, instead of the main course. Perhaps this was just because of the fact that we could regenerate our cnidocytes faster and jet more often, but they seemed to be doing the same to the diatoms…

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What do you want to evolve?
A) A pair of eye-like sensory organs, allowing basic sight. (Sight +++)
B) A meta-skeleton, a cellular exoskeleton to help defend against attacks. (Defence +++)
C) A thicker cytoskeleton, to protect organelles inside the body of the cell. (Defence +++)
D) A layer of trichocysts, smaller and weaker cnidocytes, under the cell membrane, to sting whatever organism touches us. (Defence ++, Attack +)
E) Enlarge our size, to increase cellular mass and grow in size and strength. (Defence ++, Attack ++, Speed -)
F) A horn-like protrusion, used to penetrate through other cell membranes. (Attack ++, Defence +)
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OathinBlood
Posted: Apr 25 2007, 08:26 PM


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Cnidomecium lentescomes – ‘Sticky Stinger’
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Our protists had mutated once again, and this time their evolution appeared in the form of numerous trichocysts that appeared under their cell membrane, jutting out like miniscule needles. They were triggered by something touching them, anything, and when something did, the cysts would activate, and launch out like a harpoon. Our population was now so numerous, and these trichocysts so effective, that if some larger vertebrate had immersed a hand or foot in the water in which we lived, they would have felt that it was sticky. In reality, they would be feeling the stinging of millions of cellular harpoons, but to them, it’d feel sticky. This new offensive defence had it’s side-effects, though these weren’t entirely unpleasant. If a Leviathan Worm swam through our area, willingly or not, we’d stick to it, and catch a ride on it’s skin. If our jets were ready, a quick burst of our hyponome, and we’d un-attach ourselves – but if not, we risked the possibility of it swimming off into the depths with us. This, although not common enough to have a major effect on our population, did happen quite commonly, and we lost a couple thousand of our population, never to be seen again. This was now the only danger the worms could cause to us, for with our new trigger-activated armour, we were no longer a tasty target.

The diatoms and amoebas also underwent mutations, and they were a long way from the defence-less phytoplankton and amoeboid juggernauts that they used to be. The diatoms had developed the ability to accumulate toxins in the water as they swam, and now their cytoplasm tasted sour, the acidic toxins making it so. The amoebas, on the other hand, were now the whales of the cellular world, massive filter-feeders who hid and avoided confrontation as much as possible. Prey was now hard to come by – we couldn’t feed on the worms, the diatoms, although easy to kill, were sour and distasteful, and the amoebas were too big to engulf. Our photosynthesis gave us the ability to survive, though to live, we still had to predate on other cells, eventually.

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What do you want to evolve?
A) A pair of eye-like sensory organs, allowing basic sight. (Sight +++)
B) A meta-skeleton, a cellular exoskeleton to help defend against attacks. (Defence +++)
C) A thicker cytoskeleton, to protect organelles inside the body of the cell. (Defence +++)
D) Increase the size of the endoplasmic reticulum, to manufacture more proteins and lipids, allowing us to store more energy and accumulate it in the form of fat. (Metabolism +++)
E) Enlarge our size, to increase cellular mass and grow in size and strength. (Defence ++, Attack ++, Speed -)
F) A horn-like protrusion, used to penetrate through other cell membranes. (Attack ++, Defence +)
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OathinBlood
Posted: Apr 27 2007, 12:06 AM


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Cnidomecium sicilivenator – ‘Spiky Predator’
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Over the centuries, as had become prevalent for our protists, nature granted them a gift – or rather, a chance for a gift. Our protists had responded to the shortage of prey with an unusual reaction – swelling in size. When they grew in size, several things happened, some of which were good, and some of which were bad. Their cnidocytes and trichocysts grew along with them, enhancing their ability to wound and protect themselves, but their added mass made them slower. Also, their lifespans grew a couple days shorter, due to their surface area to volume ratio decreasing, making their lives less efficient for longer. Although their larger bodies needed more energy as well, due to their unique endosymbionts, they also generated more energy, and could go without prey for slightly longer now. Overall, the pros balanced the cons, even very slightly outweighing them – but another factor was affected, something that turned the tables for the cons. The cnidocytes were never very efficient weapons, due to their need to regenerate after each use, but in large numbers, the population could sting thousands of times at once, making it a rather deadly ordeal for whichever predator decided to bother them. Now though, due to their larger size, the densely packed clouds that once existed had to disperse, and our protists’ strength in numbers was lost.

On the upside, our speed, size, and brainpower had finally united to allow us a slight choice in our species’ future. When our size increased, we seemed to tune in to the environment at a different level, and could perceive things that we could not perceive before. One of those things happened to be an ocean current that washed flotsam and jetsam down into the mid-depths of the tide pool. We had not strayed in that area before, because it was out of our scale, but now we had the choice to venture down a bit further. The sun’s rays reached down their, albeit significantly less – though there might be more prey down there to feed on.

The other species in our environment had not undergone any major changes – though the amoebas had seemed to devolve, decreasing in size. They, now seen at random intervals, and appeared to be on the brink of extinction. The Leviathan Worms were more wary of us, as with our larger trichocysts, were were the thorn in their side – literally.

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Do you want to allow yourselves to be washed down into the lower depths of the tide pool?
A) Yes.
B) No.

What do you want to evolve?
A) Bad-tasting cytoplasm, choosing to ingest several mildly poisonous chemicals in the water to make our cytoplasm taste bad to predators. (Defence +++)
B) A meta-skeleton, a cellular exoskeleton to help defend against attacks. (Defence +++)
C) A smaller, secondary pair of more sensitive cellular cilia-tentacles. (Touch ++, Attack +)
D) Increase the size of the endoplasmic reticulum, to manufacture more proteins and lipids, allowing us to store more energy and accumulate it in the form of fat. (Metabolism +++)
E) A thicker cytoskeleton, to protect organelles inside the body of the cell. (Defence +++)
F) Specially adapted mouth parts, to change the way we can feed.
----- I) A feathery filter-mouth, to filter nutrients and minute phytoplankton out of the water. (The ability to gain nutrients from phytoplankton in addition to larger prey.)
----- II) A circular, sharp-but-rough tooth-like mouth, to hang to and grind off flesh to eat. This is a very specialized mouth, and will only allow our protists to feed larger organisms, not including diatoms and amoebas. (Attack +++)
----- III) A series of flaps and sharp teeth-like protrusions, like an insect mouth on a cellular scale. (Attack +++)
----- IV) A sharp, needle-like proboscis to feed on body liquids. This is a very specialized mouth, and will only allow our protists to feed larger organisms, not including diatoms and amoebas. (Attack +++)
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OathinBlood
Posted: Apr 28 2007, 07:09 PM


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Cnidomecium aceros – ‘Sharp Mouth’
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In the centuries that followed the diatoms’ hugely successful evolution, the predators that ate it, mainly the Leviathan Worms and ourselves, were forced to adapt. We adapted by developing a long, follow, needle-like proboscis, which we used to feed on the massive Leviathan Worms. Using our cilia, flagella, and jet-like hyponome, we would throw ourselves into their paths, letting our trichocysts trigger to stick us onto them, then securing ourselves with our barbed tentacles. Then, we would proceed to drain their bodily fluids – mainly their blood. This was a golden age for us – Cnidomecium aceros, the dreaded unicellular vampires of the tide-pool. We were so successful that for the first time since we had met them, we had succeeded in bringing down several of the worms. If several hundred of us were on one, it would lose blood faster than it could be replaced, and perish. However, this seemingly huge victory was hollow. Their corpses were no use to us, seeing as we could not eat the flesh, and there would be one less source of food for us. We had grown, as hard as it was to believe, too effective.

In fact, our prowess led to the development of an offshoot of the near-extinct amoebas. This new offshoot was smaller, and bred rapidly. It fed on the nutrients excreted by the Leviathan Worm corpses, and was so successful that every time one died, it seemed like it was enveloped by a cloud or smog. However, these new amoebas didn’t interact with us, neither positively or negatively.

The Leviathan Worms, in response to the diatoms’ distasteful cytoplasm, had developed a slight resistance to poison, so that they could continue preying on their main food-source.

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What do you want to evolve? You have entered a rare golden age. Choose two.
A) Bad-tasting cytoplasm, choosing to ingest several mildly poisonous chemicals in the water to make our cytoplasm taste bad to predators. (Defence +++)
B) A meta-skeleton, a cellular exoskeleton to help defend against attacks. (Defence +++)
C) A smaller, secondary pair of more sensitive cellular cilia-tentacles. (Touch ++, Attack +)
D) Increase the size of the endoplasmic reticulum, to manufacture more proteins and lipids, allowing us to store more energy and accumulate it in the form of fat. (Metabolism +++)
E) A thicker cytoskeleton, to protect organelles inside the body of the cell. (Defence +++)
F) Poison tolerance, to grow very slightly resistant to some poisons in the water. (The ability to resist some poisons.)
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OathinBlood
Posted: May 5 2007, 06:44 PM


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Cnidomecium massodeino – ‘Bulky Terror’
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Our over-effectiveness was made use of during the course of millions of years. By increasing the size of our endoplasmic reticulum, we could produce more lipids and proteins, therefore making fat in which we could store energy in. We would now attach onto the Leviathan Worms, sucking blood and converting it into energy which we stored. Then, we would detach, and float aimlessly photosynthesizing, until we were forced to use our stored energy. When that was gone, we would attach to another worm, and begin the process anew.

In addition to the endoplasmic reticulum, our organelles developed a slight resistance to some of the natural water-borne toxins that would sometimes kill off a few of our number. It wasn’t enough to really make a difference, but nonetheless we developed it.

Our environment changed much over the years. The amoebas had gone completely extinct, unable to reproduce fast enough to bring up their dwindling numbers. The Necrophage Amoebas were in greater numbers than ever, feeding off the corpses of their evolutionary fathers, the Amoebas. The Leviathan Worms had decreased in number, mostly due to us, but there was another, unknown factor in their decreased population. The Diatoms were as populous as ever, with their only predator being the Leviathan Worms, since we now shunned them. Life was good, with the only major problem being slight overpopulation.

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What do you want to evolve?
A) A pair of eye-like sensory organs, allowing basic sight. (Sight +++)
B) A flatter, more streamlined body shape, to become more hydrodynamic, and also be less noticeable when attached to our host. (Speed +++, Stealth +++)
C) Siphon silica out of the water for use in the cell membrane, making us dramatically harder to penetrate but also less manoeuvrable and flexible. (Defence ++++++, Control ---)
D) Barbed tentacles, tentacles with minute thin spines on them to grip better. (Attack +++)
E) Produce an endospore-like structure, to insure survival even in the harshest of conditions. (The ability to survive nearly environmental damage.)
F) Enlarge our size, to increase cellular mass and grow in size and strength. (Defence ++, Attack ++, Speed -)
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OathinBlood
Posted: May 10 2007, 09:31 PM


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Cnidomecium campestihemoraptor – ‘Flat Blood Thief’
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We had grown too effective, and were quickly cutting a swathe through the Leviathan Worm’s populations. Our simplistic cell brain could not grasp the concept of long-term survival, so we continued to feed, and feed, and feed. We could latch onto the Leviathan Worms and drain them of fluids with very little energy loss, thanks to the combination of our endoplasmic reticulum, photosynthesis, and trichocysts. Evolution would not stop it’s course, however. Although we were effective, there were always mutations, and we continued to improve. Our bodies grew slimmer and flatter, giving us two benefits. The water would flow around us instead of into us, making our form more hydrodynamic and faster, not that we needed it. The second benefit was allowing us to lie flatter against the skin of our host and be less noticeable, something always good for a parasitic lifestyle.

Our population had begun to spread out, and we loss several thousand. Our species was spreading across the globe, several litres at a time. It was helpful, but it did not solve the problem of our dieing hosts. There seemed another factor, besides us, that was killing them off. At the same time, our bristle-cilia began to sense different vibrations in the water. The tide coming in and out had always created vibrations, and this new vibration was somewhat like it – colossal, it’s scale unparallel to our microscopically minute bodies…

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What do you want to evolve?
A) Specialize a vacuole for storage of excess lipids, so that energy can be further preserved in reserves. (Metabolism +++)
B) Increase the ratio of mitochondria in our body, giving us more energy but also forcing us to consume more. (Speed ++, Control ++, Attack ++, Metabolism ---)
C) Siphon silica out of the water for use in the cell membrane, making us dramatically harder to penetrate but also less manoeuvrable and flexible. (Defence ++++++, Control ---)
D) Barbed tentacles, tentacles with minute thin spines on them to grip better. (Attack +++)
E) Produce an endospore-like structure, to insure survival even in the harshest of conditions. (The ability to survive nearly environmental damage.)
F) Enlarge our size, to increase cellular mass and grow in size and strength. (Defence ++, Attack ++, Speed -)
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OathinBlood
Posted: May 12 2007, 02:35 PM


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Cnidomecium pinguihabitum - ‘Fat Holder’
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The Leviathan Worms were dieing left and right. Some unknown force was slaughtering them faster than we could ever hope to – sometimes, the worms were taken while hundreds of us were still on them, killing us as well. The worms were being forcibly grabbed and ripped into a dark hole, from which they, and ourselves on them, never returned. It was no doubt a living creature, but one of such size that we couldn’t think to comprehend it’s vastness, since our unicellular bodies were so relatively insignificant. Although this new threat was not preying on us, it was indirectly massacring us. If it didn’t eat the worms which we were feeding on, it still ate worms which we would need to feed on, dramatically cutting our food supply. The result of that was us being forced to drift about longer than normal, photosynthesizing instead of sucking blood. Of course, Nature threw us another fortune in the form of a specially-modified vacuole which would store lipids ripe with energy, keeping us alive longer without a host to feed on. This was but a short-term solution for a long term problem. If the Leviathan Worms were to go extinct, there were no other multicellular organisms to feed on, for this new worm-eater was to large to even approach – it’s movement through the water created waves which we could not penetrate.

The Diatoms had seemed to hit an evolutionary standstill, since their only predator, the Leviathan Worms, were now in danger of extinction. The Rot Smog also seemed to be doing fine, not that it effected our lives at all.

Meanwhile, the ocean's currents had picked up, and a couple of one-way aquatic highways opened up to us.

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Which current do you want to enter?
A) The current that came with the incoming high tides.
B) The current that went with the outgoing low tides.
C) Avoid both, and remain in the tide pool.

What do you want to evolve?
A) Develop a coat of chitinous polysaccharides over our cell membrane, weighing us down but making us nigh impenetrable. (Defence +++++++++, Speed ---, Control ---)
B) Increase the number of mitochondria in our body, giving us more energy but also forcing us to consume more. (Speed ++, Control ++, Attack ++, Metabolism ---)
C) A smaller, secondary pair of more sensitive cellular cilia-tentacles. (Touch ++, Attack +)
D) Develop hollow cilia, lightening our weight and making us faster. (Speed ++, Control +)
E) Develop stronger digestive enzymes, allowing us to digest blood faster. (Metabolism ---)
F) Specially adapted cilia that are flattened on the end, used like paddles to provide ultimate control of our direction. (Control +++)
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OathinBlood
Posted: May 13 2007, 08:00 PM


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Cnidomecium interimovenator - ‘Hunted Hunter’
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With our hosts quickly dieing, we needed to move to a new environment. About half of our population spread out to the top of the tide-pool, where the tide would either force itself forward or drain itself backward. The majority of us were caught in the forward tide, and we were pushed into a new environment. It seemed that instead of a beach, we were washed into the mouth of a river – a brackish estuary. The estuary was overrun with green algae. Algae coated the walls, the rocks, the bottom…it even tainted the water green. We had entered a whole new ecosystem, one with a lot more advanced life – multicellular life.

At the top of the water, there was a large amount of something. These somethings were huge compared to us – but then again, just about anything multicellular was huge to us. They were green, and had a huge flat circular growth on their back. These things didn’t directly interfere with us, as their life seemed to be composed of swimming around to the patches of water heated by the sun, and remain still, presumably soaking up the solar energy. But their sun-seeking behaviour and size would often blot out the sun entirely, so that we could not photosynthesize. Luckily, the few times that we could photosynthesize, we could store the energy for later use. Still, this was rapidly killing off the Veridiplasts, our endosynbionts.

On the upside, there were two organisms that we could drain blood from. One was small enough that we could identify it – a ground-dwelling worm that had an armoured head shaped like a T. These Hammerhead Worms were plentiful enough, and their blood was similar to the Leviathan Worms. The second possible host was a free-swimming thing of some kind, too big for us to identify. It’s fish-like body provided two possibilities for us, since it often swum around with it’s mouth wide open, presumably feeding off something in the water. We could adhere to it’s relatively thin skin as we usually did, or we could let ourselves be swallowed by it, and adhere to the inside of it’s mouth. The blood flow was stronger here, more nourishing, though sometimes we would slip off and down into it’s bowels.

Our main predators in this new brackish environment were viciously fast dart-shaped cells, called Hunter Darts. They were about the same size as us, and had enough speed to propel their sharp, sleek bodies into us, impaling us. The other predator was a larger albeit slower round-ish cell which used specialized cilia-paddles to move and had three large horns on it’s front. It wasn’t much of a threat, though some of our number would fall prey to it. The Hunter Darts, on the other hand, were absolutely fit to hunt us down and feed off of us. We could only fight back the first wave, because by the time the second wave came our cnidocytes still weren’t regenerated. The trichocysts helped minimally, killing a fifth of our attackers. Despite the many stings and lashes we were capable of delivering, the Hunter Darts and Spike-Crest Oars were determined to get at us. The fatalities that they received were worth weathering to get at our extremely nutritious bodies. The energy-storage vacuole was priceless to the voracious predators, having enough energy to feed them for a good long while.

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What do you want to do?
A) Prey solely on the blood of one host species.
----- I) The Hunter Darts, small and swift predatory cells.
----- II) The Spike-Crest Oars, large and armored predatory cells.
----- III) The Hammerhead Worms, partially armored detritivores.
----- IV) The unknown swimming creature with a gaping mouth.
-------- IVi) The inside of the mouth of the unknown swimming creature.
B) Prey equally on the various species, both unicellular and multicellular.
C) Prey solely on the unicellular creatures.
D) Prey solely on the multicellular creatures.

What do you want to evolve?
A) Develop a coat of chitinous polysaccharides over our cell membrane, weighing us down but making us nigh impenetrable. (Defence +++++++++, Speed ---, Control ---)
B) A secondary pair of cnidocytes, to deter predators and hurt prey.
----- I) Directly beside the existing pair, to double the pain and damage we can inflict. (Attack ++, Defence +)
----- II) At the end of the tentacles, to increase striking range. (Attack +++)
----- III) Flanking the flagella, for rear defence. (Defence +++)
C) A smaller, secondary pair of more sensitive cellular cilia-tentacles. (Touch ++, Attack +)
D) Develop hollow cilia, lightening our weight and making us faster. (Speed ++, Control +)
E) Develop stronger digestive enzymes, allowing us to digest blood faster. (Metabolism ---)
F) Specially adapted cilia that are flattened on the end, used like paddles to provide ultimate control of our direction. (Control +++)
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OathinBlood
Posted: May 26 2007, 01:55 AM


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Cnidomecium vescoris - ‘Mouth Eater’
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We had fled from the starvation-laced waters of our tide pool into this brackish estuary, where we found food in the form of Hammerhead Worms and other larger multicellular creatures, but were stalked and hunted at every turn for the precious gifts of energy inside of us. Spreading out to the various hosts, our species found most success as an endoparasite, living inside the mouth of a large free-swimming organism. It wasn’t a fish – the world was still far too primordial for that - but it seemed to be a massive algae-eating fish-like copepod. The inside of it’s mouth held denser, thicker water, presumably made so by some sort of mucus or saliva secreted by the organism. Visibility was almost zero inside their mouths, not that it affected us at all. Their mouth-water was a near-opaque green, from all the algae they ate.

Life inside the mouth was relatively safe, for no predators dared to stray into it, lacking the adhesive devices that we had evolved. Still, although our population rose, it was not by much. The mouth of a fish-copepod were not the most productive for population growth, especially since we had not yet grown resistant to any of the host’s natural defences.

Still, we had a foothold in this new environment from which to secure our evolutionary niche.

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Where inside the mouth do you want to cluster?
A) On the broad, flat area just inside the mouth of the organism.
B) On the roof of the broad, flat area just inside the mouth of the organism.
C) Further down in the mouth, where the area narrows, just before the throat.
D) In the slippery, mucus-lined walls of the throat.

What do you want to evolve?
A) Produce an extremely thin, brittle silicon shell that will trap the denser material in the host’s mouth, such as saliva and detritus, so that we have a very flexible, globular sac-shell, letting us survive longer, but not indefinitely, in the host’s stomach.
B) A secondary pair of cnidocytes, to deter predators and hurt prey.
----- I) Directly beside the existing pair, to double the pain and damage we can inflict. (Attack ++, Defence +)
----- II) At the end of the tentacles, to increase striking range. (Attack +++)
----- III) Flanking the flagella, for rear defence. (Defence +++)
C) Produce an endospore-like structure, to insure survival even in the harshest of conditions. (Environmental Disaster Survival)
D) Develop a narrow polysaccharide horn-like spike, for offensive defensive uses, as well as serving other purposes. (Attack +++)
E) Enlarge our size, to increase cellular mass and grow in size and strength. (Defence ++, Attack ++, Speed -)
F) Group the veridiplasts into bud-like bunches on the exterior of the body, for more effective photosythesis. (More Effective Photosynthesis)
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OathinBlood
Posted: Jun 15 2007, 11:42 PM


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Cnidomecium squamoris - ‘Mouth Scale’
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Inside the gaping maws of our newest host, the Ichthyopods, we found paradisium. Thousands of us would be able to settle on the roof of the mouth. With our flat streamlined bodies and chitinous armour, we resembled microscopic scales. The Ichthyopods did not seem to mind our presence, despite us feeding on their blood. They were large enough that we couldn’t drain enough blood to hurt them, no matter our numbers. Instead, we lived in a peaceful relationship between parasite and host…for several hundred years, at least.

Although we may have not put the Ichthyopods in any serious danger, contracting ‘scale mouth’, as epidemics of us were called, was not a comfortable feeling. Soon, small fleshy knobs grew in the fish-insects’ mouths, and they secreted a thick, adhesive mucus. The mucus would grow and grow until it became a globular slime-ball, which would stick to our bodies. When there were a suitable amount of us in there, it was swallowed by the Ichthyopod. Our host had finally begun fighting back.

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What do you want to evolve?
A) Produce an extremely thin, brittle silicon shell that will trap the denser material in the host’s mouth, such as saliva and detritus, so that we have a very flexible, globular sac-shell, letting us survive longer, but not indefinitely, in the host’s stomach. (Ichthyopod Gastric/Saliva Acid Immunity)
B) A smaller, secondary pair of more sensitive cellular cilia-tentacles. (Touch ++, Attack +)
C) Specially adapted cilia that are flattened on the end, used like paddles to provide ultimate control of our direction. (Control +++)
D) Develop a narrow polysaccharide horn-like spike, for offensive defensive uses, as well as serving other purposes. (Attack +++)
E) Enlarge our size, to increase cellular mass and grow in size and strength. (Defence ++, Attack ++, Speed -)
F) Group the veridiplasts into bud-like bunches on the exterior of the body, for more effective photosynthesis. (More Effective Photosynthesis)
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OathinBlood
Posted: Jun 22 2007, 08:30 PM


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Cnidomecium slimitergum - ‘Slime-Back’
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The adhesive globules of mucus produced by the Ichthyopods were quickly turned to our advantage. By filtering silicon out of the water, we were able to develop thin, brittle silicon shells, which on their own, would be near useless. What these shells did instead was collect the dense balls of mucus and keep them in a spherical shell, forming a defensive layer around our body which allowed us to become immune to the strong algae-digesting acids in the Ichthyopod’s stomach. The shell opened up another potential environment for us, and again we were faced with a choice.

Still, while we thrived, the very creatures which had previously saved us the effort of constantly leeching blood we now dieing, unable to photosynthesize much in the mouth of the Ichthyopods. Surely, and astonishingly rapidly, they were going extinct.

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What do you want to do?
A) Relocate the majority of our numbers to the stomach of the Ichthyopod.
B) Remain on the roof of the Ichthyopod’s mouth.
C) Relocate to another place in the Ichthyopod’s mouth.
----- I) On the broad, flat area just inside the mouth of the organism.
----- II) Further down in the mouth, where the area narrows, just before the throat.
----- III) In the slippery, mucus-lined walls of the throat.
D) Leave the Ichthyopod altogether, returning to the algae-waters of the brackish estuary.

What do you want to evolve?
A) Barbed tentacles, tentacles with minute thin spines on them to grip better. (Attack +++)
B) Siphon silica out of the water for use in the cell membrane, making us dramatically harder to penetrate but also less manoeuvrable and flexible. (Defence ++++++, Control ---)
C) Develop stronger digestive enzymes, allowing us to digest blood faster. (Metabolism ---)
D) Develop hollow cilia, lightening our weight and making us faster. (Speed ++, Control +)
E) Develop a grouping behaviour, so we are inclined to gather in large numbers and clusters. (Alternate Step to Multicellular)
----- I) (Attack ++, Defence +)
----- II) (Defence ++, Attack +)
F) Develop endospores for the veridiplasts, allowing them to die and yet be safely reborn when there are favourable conditions. (Environmental Disaster Survival for Veridiplasts)
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OathinBlood
Posted: Jun 24 2007, 02:07 PM


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Cnidomecium hortusuperstes - ‘Surviving Garden’
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The silicon-mucus shell that we had evolved to defend ourselves from the Ichthyopod’s adhesive saliva had worked well, enlarging us substantially and protecting us as we had hoped, but it’s spherical shape prevented all of our locomotive organelles from working, save the water-jet hyponome and flagella. Our cilia, and defensive trichocysts at that, had been fully enveloped by the silicon-mucus shell. This did not affect us much in the Ichthyopod’s mouth, for we had no predators and lived and died on the living plains of Ichthyopod’s mouth roof. Our only problem in the safety of the mouth was the lack of sunlight, which was causing our long-time endosymbionts, the veridiplasts, to rapidly decrease in numbers.

The evolutionary forces of nature had solved that, by the means of a rapidly spreading mutation which allowed the veridiplasts to die off safely, knowing that their massively durable endospores would revive when the conditions were right. Our protists reaped their rewards from this evolution as well – when the veridiplasts would die, their bodies would be digested as extra food. The rare times that we were exposed to sunlight, our backs would bloom in shades of green, and we would be able to enjoy the pleasures of photosynthesis for a bit. And so life went on, with no outstanding problems, we were in the perfect position to multiply, feed, and grow.

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What do you want to evolve? You have entered a rare golden age. Choose two.
A) Barbed tentacles, tentacles with minute thin spines on them to grip better. (Attack +++)
B) Siphon silica out of the water for use in the cell membrane, making us dramatically harder to penetrate but also less manoeuvrable and flexible. (Defence ++++++, Control ---)
C) Develop stronger digestive enzymes, allowing us to digest blood faster. (Metabolism ---)
D) Enlarge our size, to increase cellular mass and grow in size and strength. (Defence ++, Attack ++, Speed -)
E) Develop a grouping behaviour, so we are inclined to gather in large numbers and clusters. (Alternate Step to Multicellular)
----- I) (Attack ++, Defence +)

----- II) (Defence ++, Attack +)
F) Develop small, sharp ‘claws’ on the ends of the cilia, so that our cilia can regain function as rudimentary legs. (Speed +, Control +, Attack +)
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